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The Wharrie Cabmans Shelter

A Grade II Listed Building in Hampstead Town, London

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Coordinates

Latitude: 51.5529 / 51°33'10"N

Longitude: -0.1683 / 0°10'5"W

OS Eastings: 527093

OS Northings: 185367

OS Grid: TQ270853

Mapcode National: GBR D0.XZ2

Mapcode Global: VHGQS.17DD

Entry Name: The Wharrie Cabmans Shelter

Location: Camden, London, NW3

County: London

District: Camden

Locality: Hampstead Town

Traditional County: Middlesex

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Greater London

Listing Date: 24 October 2002

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

English Heritage Legacy ID: 489820

Source ID: 1067834

Listing Text


798-1/0/10194 ROSSLYN HILL
24-OCT-02 The Wharrie Cabman's Shelter

GV II

The Wharrie Cabman's Shelter

Cabman's shelter. 1935 by Elisabeth Scott of Scott, Chesterton and Shepherd. Elm boarding on cedar frame, standing on concrete legs. Metal windows. Single storey kiosk on Coffee-stall with shelter to right. Deep eaves with decorative panels underneath. Mosaic panel designed by John Cooper set into floor in front of counter dated April 1935 and inscribed THE WHARRIE SHELTER, depicting taxi-related objects in a Cubist-influenced composition.
HISTORY: this kiosk was donated by Mary Wharrie, daughter of Sir Henry Harben, first Mayor of Hampstead. It replaced an earlier structure on this prominent site, which had been given to the Borough of Hampstead by the Harbens. It is a very unusual structure, designed in a Modern Movement vein, with a mosaic of high quality. The paintwork to doors and window frames was originally painted in red and yellow. Scott (1898-1972) had gained her reputation through winning the 1928 competition for the Shakespeare Memorial Theatre at Stratford-upon-Avon.
SOURCES: The Architect and Building news, 17th May 1935, 170 & 190-91; Hampstead & Highgate Express, 22 November 1996.

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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