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Church of All Saints

A Grade I Listed Building in Godshill, Isle of Wight

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Coordinates

Latitude: 50.6338 / 50°38'1"N

Longitude: -1.2559 / 1°15'21"W

OS Eastings: 452723

OS Northings: 81826

OS Grid: SZ527818

Mapcode National: GBR 9DP.1BW

Mapcode Global: FRA 878D.DKV

Entry Name: Church of All Saints

Listing Date: 18 January 1967

Grade: I

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1209229

English Heritage Legacy ID: 392733

Location: Godshill, Isle of Wight, PO38

County: Isle of Wight

Civil Parish: Godshill

Traditional County: Hampshire

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Isle of Wight

Church of England Parish: Godshill All Saints

Church of England Diocese: Portsmouth

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Godshill

Listing Text

GODSHILL

SZ5268 CHURCH HILL
1353-0/7/128 CHURCH OF ALL SAINTS
18/01/67

GV I

Parish church. Lower part of west tower, chancel east window,
south chapel windows and transepts early C14. Perpendicular 6
bay arcade to nave and chancel (replacing early C14 arcade).
C15 south transept roof C16 top of tower, C17 south aisle west
window, Nave north window and south transept bell cote and C18
remodelling of north transept and Worsley chapel and south
porch. Built of Isle of Wight stone rubble with ashlar quoins
and south porch. Tiled roof. Double 3 bay nave, leading to
double 3 bay chancel without division, (the north now used as
a chapel), North and south transepts (the latter with sanctus
bell in niche in gable end), south porch and west tower. West
tower: lower part is early C14. Square shape of 3 stages with
stepped buttresses. The lowest stage has an arch with double
cusped head and quatrefoil window above. Middle stage has
early C14 lancet. Top stage is C16 with stone double lancet
bell openings with pierced stone screens. Crenellated parapet
with 8 pinnacles and cornice with grotesque waterspouts.
Double nave: Perpendicular with angled buttresses. South aisle
west window is early C17. 4 bay arched mullioned and transomed
window with hood moulding. The south side has one double
lancet with hood moulding and one triple lancet. North side
has 2 buttresses, one cinquefoil-headed lancet and a wider
arched window with drip moulding. South porch is mid C18.
Gabled with kneelers. Round-headed arch with keystone and
impost blocks. Stone benches with wooden seats. To the right
of the south door is a mediaeval stoup restored in 1918. South
transept is early C14. South window with triple cinquefoil
headed lights with trefoils above in arched window with hood
moulding. Angled buttresses and C17 sanctus bell in niche in
gable. South chancel has to south 3 arched windows with double
trefoiled heads with trefoil and quatrefoil motifs above. East
window has reticulated tracery. North chancel has an east
window with intersecting tracery and one double trefoiled
window with trefoil and quatrefoil motifs above. North
transept is early C14 remodelled in C18 to form the Worsley
chapel. Angled buttresses and deep plinth. Round-headed window
with keystone and impost blocks. Interior: Naves have C15
Perpendicular 6 bay arcade with octagonal columns on square
bases. Roof has tie beams, collar beams, purlins and brackets.
South door is late Mediaeval, of 6 planks studded. Early C14
arch through to west tower with 3 continuous chambers.
Opposite the south porch is a painting by Rubens or school of
Rubens depicting Daniel in the Lions' Den. 3 hatchments.
Monument to Sir Richard Worsley Bart. Comptroller of the
Household, Privy Councillor and Governor of the Isle of Wight
(d.1803) in south west of nave. Oval stone plinth bearing oval
stone sarcophagus, fluted at ends with carved foliated side
panels, 6 clawed feet and vitruvian scroll panel above plinth.
Chancels: North chancel has trefoliated piscina in north wall,
late C17 communion rail and late C17 or early C18 painting of
the Ten Commandments held by a prophet and a soldier with
sunrays between. Monument to James Worsley (d.1787) on left
side of North transept by Bingley London. Wall tablet with
black marble obelisk and white marble urn with grieving female
mourner. Monument to Rev. Francis Worsley d.1808. A wall
tablet with black marble obelisk and white flaming urn.
Monument to Sir John Leigh and wife (d.1529) between chancel
and north chapel. Alabaster effigies on chest with quatrefoil
motifs with above, 4 centred arches with cusping and
sub-cusping. Tracery panelling inside and traceried spandrels.
Cresting with 3 angel busts bearing shields. Monument to Sir
James Worsley of Appuldurcombe (d.1536) and wife (d.1557) in
chancel north wall. 2 kneeling figures with lecterns in
architectural surround with Ionic pilasters and frieze with
sinuous foliage and central mask. Apex and corners of pediment
have putti bearing shields. Monument to Richard Worsley
(d.1565) in south wall of north chancel. Large standing
monument with strapwork plinth and Vitruvian scroll with
pilasters helm and gauntlets above. Monument to Stuart Worsley
(d1708) in east wall of north chapel. An elaborate wall plaque
with drapery, central shield, mourning cherubs in the corners
and winged death's head below. Smaller and plainer C18 marble
tablets to members of the Worsley family. North transept was
completely remodelled to accommodate the monument to Sir
Robert Worsley (d.1747) and his brother. This very large
monument in the Roman style is inscribed but in the style of
Scheemakers. This comprizes pink columns and pilasters
supporting pediment with triglyph frieze with metopes of
wolves heads and wreaths, crowned by military trophies. In the
centre is an obelisk and plain tapering sarcophagus with 2
draped busts wearing Roman costume. 2 mourning putti, one with
anchor the other leaning against a column, stand in front of
the pilasters. South transept has a fine C15 wagon roof with
plastered panels, central boss and grotesque heads on arches.
The east wall has a celebrated C15 or early C16 wall painting
of Christ hanging from a foliated cross of 3 boughs in leaf.
(B.O.E. Hampshire and the Isle of Wight: The foliated cross is
illustration 41: 746 -747; VCH: 175).


Listing NGR: SZ5272481822

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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