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Aberdour House, Obelisk

A Category B Listed Building in Aberdour (Fife), Fife

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Coordinates

Latitude: 56.0524 / 56°3'8"N

Longitude: -3.2988 / 3°17'55"W

OS Eastings: 319205

OS Northings: 685156

OS Grid: NT192851

Mapcode National: GBR 24.QNVW

Mapcode Global: WH6S5.94DG

Entry Name: Aberdour House, Obelisk

Location: Aberdour (Fife)

County: Fife

Parish: Aberdour (Fife)

Locality: Inverkeithing and Dalgety Bay

Traditional County: Fife

Listing Date: 2 May 1973

Category: B

Source: Historic Scotland

Building Class: Cultural

Historic Scotland Designation Reference: LB3638

Source ID: 334756

Description

1744-1745. 40-foot high ashlar obelisk prominently located to crown of Cuttlehill. Square stone base, square-plan pedestal; moulded base, cornice to upper section surmounted by obelisk.

Statement of Interest

NOTES: B-Group with Aberdour House and Aberdour House Entrance Gateway. Under the instruction of the 13th Earl of Morton work began on the obelisk in 1744 and was completed in 1745. It was sited on Cuttlehill to act as a landmark visible from the Earl's Dalmahoy estate across the Forth. The Obelisk lies southwest of Aberdour Castle (see separate listing) and Aberdour House (see separate listing), Aberdour House was originally known as Cuttlehill House and became the Morton's residence after they left the Castle in 1725. Work commenced on the obelisk with a local carpenter spending 3 days fixing a mast and scaffolding to the proposed site, the local smith supplied nails for the scaffold and also a hoist. Robert Cunningham is attributed as the mason, it is recorded that 676 of "broached work" and 88ft of moulded work was quarried at a cost of 1s. per foot. In 1745 it is documented that the local smith was paid for 2 chisels which were needed to take down the scaffolding.

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