History in Structure

This site is entirely user-supported. See how you can help.

Hempstead Manor Farmhouse

A Grade II* Listed Building in Uckfield, East Sussex

Approximate Location Map
Large Map »
Street View
Contributor Photos »

Street View is the best available vantage point looking, if possible, towards the location of the building. In some locations, Street View may not give a view of the actual building, or may not be available at all. Where it is not available, the satellite view is shown instead.

Coordinates

Latitude: 50.9758 / 50°58'32"N

Longitude: 0.1153 / 0°6'54"E

OS Eastings: 548597

OS Northings: 121730

OS Grid: TQ485217

Mapcode National: GBR LQ5.RYF

Mapcode Global: FRA C64J.LQ1

Entry Name: Hempstead Manor Farmhouse

Listing Date: 26 November 1953

Grade: II*

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1028392

English Heritage Legacy ID: 296119

Location: Uckfield, Wealden, East Sussex, TN22

County: East Sussex

District: Wealden

Civil Parish: Uckfield

Built-Up Area: Uckfield

Traditional County: Sussex

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): East Sussex

Church of England Parish: Framfield St Thomas a Becket

Church of England Diocese: Chichester

Find accommodation in
Uckfield

Listing Text


TQ 42 SE FRAMFIELD HEMPSTEAD ROAD
Uckfield

26/862 Hempstead Manor Farmhouse

26.11.53 II*

Manor house, later farmhouse. Comprises C15 two bay great hall to east and four bay C15 wing running north to south linked by a link block with early C17 staircase but externally early C19 and the front elevation was re-fronted at that time. Roughly L-shaped on plan. Timberframed building with close-studding exposed to east wing but otherwise re-fronted in early C19 brickwork with some weatherboarding to north. Tiled roof with fretted wooden bargeboards to gables and brick chimneystacks. Two storeys; five windows to west or entrance front. Sash windows. West front has two gables. East front has two 12-pane sashes to first floor, two taller 12- pane sashes to ground floor and round-headed staircase window to extreme right. North side of east wing has exposed close-studding and midrail with traces of original window opening to right and curved bow to left. East and south fronts of this wing are covered in early C19 brickwork but there is close-studding behind the east wall. South front has projecting left side gable with mid C19 sash, a further tripartite C19 window and gabled C19 porch, which conceals C15 arched doorcase with roll-moulding and spandrels with stag and fleur de lys. INTERIOR: great hall to east of two bays with octagonal crownpost with tall arched braces, east wall with close-studding and roll-moulding and arched doorcase with lion and unicorn in the spandrels. Elaborate C17 panelling with circular motifs. To rear of Great Hall is an unusual C17 staircase with thick turned balusters, corner posts with ball finials and carved panel underneath balusters. C18 alcove with shelves and Gibbs surround and round-headed doorcase with Gibbs surround and half-glazed door. North-south wing is of four bays with dragon beam and unchamfered beams to north ground floor room. Two bay room has open fireplace and ceiling with chamfered beams lambs tongue stops and top of an arched doorcase with spandrels. Upper floor has jowled posts, curved brace and tie beams. The roof of this range appears to have been altered in the C18 with queenpost and side purlins. Clearly this has been a house of consequence about which there is little information. Could the carvings in the door spandrels relate to a royal marriage or visit?

Listing NGR: TQ4859721730

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

Other nearby listed buildings

BritishListedBuildings.co.uk is an independent online resource and is not associated with any government department. All government data published here is used under licence. Please do not contact BritishListedBuildings.co.uk for any queries related to any individual listed building, planning permission related to listed buildings or the listing process itself.

British Listed Buildings is a Good Stuff website.