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Booden Farmhouse

A Grade II Listed Building in Haughton, Staffordshire

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Coordinates

Latitude: 52.7777 / 52°46'39"N

Longitude: -2.2068 / 2°12'24"W

OS Eastings: 386144

OS Northings: 320029

OS Grid: SJ861200

Mapcode National: GBR 170.T1P

Mapcode Global: WHBDZ.2FDX

Entry Name: Booden Farmhouse

Listing Date: 4 March 1998

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1031584

English Heritage Legacy ID: 469093

Location: Haughton, Stafford, Staffordshire, ST18

County: Staffordshire

District: Stafford

Civil Parish: Haughton

Traditional County: Staffordshire

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Staffordshire

Church of England Parish: Haughton St Giles

Church of England Diocese: Lichfield

Find accommodation in
Mitton

Listing Text

SJ81NE HAUGHTON -

603/9/10033 Booden Farmhouse

II

Farmhouse. C17; remodelled and extended in circa late C18 or early C19. Timber-framed, encased in red brick, with modillion eaves and a plain tile roof with gabled ends. Brick gable-end and axial stacks. The house has an L-shaped plan with a main, 2-storey range and rear (west) wing and later additions including C19 infill to the north-west and to the north end. There is considerable evidence of the C17 house: timber framing is visible to the west wall of the main range on the exterior and to the interior where this range abuts the rear wing; both the north end stack and the axial stack between main range and wing are of seventeenth century brick. Many of the original roof timbers are intact to the main range, those to the north end may have been re-used; the central truss is pegged and has queen posts and wattle and daub infill. There is one level of roughly-chamfered purlins. Seventeenth-century interior features include; to the south part of the main range the ground and first-floor rooms have deeply chamfered beams with pyramidal stops, the upper room also has chamfered rafters; to the north end of this range is the remains of an large fireplace, now blocked. Towards the end of the eighteenth century the rear wing was given a two storey porch with double, French doors and fanlight; arched recesses painted in imitation of sash windows were added to either side. Much of the joinery dates from c1780-1820, including the 6-fielded-panel (east) exterior and interior doors; 10/10 sashes with panelled shutters and fluted architraves to doors and windows; arches to French doors (with panelled shutters) in the rear wing to ground floor and to window recess on first floor; the dogleg staircase has stick balusters. A simple Georgian chimneypiece remains to the ground floor of this wing and there are other cast-iron chimneypieces. The house occupies a medieval moated site.

Listing NGR: SJ8614420029

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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