History in Structure

This site is entirely user-supported. See how you can help.

Church of St Michael

A Grade II* Listed Building in Benacre, Suffolk

Approximate Location Map
Large Map »
Street View
Contributor Photos »

Street View is the best available vantage point looking, if possible, towards the location of the building. In some locations, Street View may not give a view of the actual building, or may not be available at all. Where it is not available, the satellite view is shown instead.

Coordinates

Latitude: 52.4005 / 52°24'1"N

Longitude: 1.6907 / 1°41'26"E

OS Eastings: 651162

OS Northings: 284460

OS Grid: TM511844

Mapcode National: GBR YVP.G86

Mapcode Global: VHM6T.8X5P

Entry Name: Church of St Michael

Listing Date: 17 April 1986

Grade: II*

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1032110

English Heritage Legacy ID: 282037

Location: Benacre, Waveney, Suffolk, NR34

County: Suffolk

District: Waveney

Civil Parish: Benacre

Traditional County: Suffolk

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Suffolk

Church of England Parish: Covehithe St Andrew

Church of England Diocese: St.Edmundsbury and Ipswich

Find accommodation in
Henstead

Listing Text

BENACRE THE STREET
TM 58 SW
4/8 Church of St. Michael
-
- II*

Former parish church, now privately owned by Sir John Gooch. Medieval;
severely damaged by fire in C18: much restoration and rebuilding work was
carried out in 1769 by Sir Thomas Gooch; also restored 1888-90. Nave and
chancel (in one range), south aisle, west tower, south porch. Flint rubble,
the aisle and east end of the chancel probably of 1769; the upper part of the
nave, chancel and aisle walls rebuilt 1769 in red brick (to north) and pale
yellow brick (to south). Stone dressings. Pantiled roof, with glazed black
tiles to the aisle. Tower probably C14, said to have been reduced in height
late C18: square, in 2 stages, the upper stage slightly inset; later
crenellated parapet with 3 flushwork panels to each face. To the west are 5-
stage diagonal buttresses and a restored C15 2-light window. Small single-
light bell-chamber openings except the south, which has 2 lights with cusped
Y-tracery. Lower walls of nave and chancel probably C13. To the north the
nave has 4 2-light windows of 1769 in Perpendicular style, and a blocked C15
doorway with hoodmould and stone shields in the spandrels. 2-bay chancel with
Y-traceried wooden windows of 1769; renewed 3-light east window, the opening
shafted internally. The south chancel wall has small remains of 2 original
lancet window openings. 3-bay aisle, originally C14 but substantially rebuilt
1769; C14 moulded doorway; original window opening to west, now blocked. Red
brick porch, probably of 1769. Interior. C14 6-bay aisle arcade. C13
octagonal font bowl, of Purbeck marble, with 2 shallow-recessed arches to each
face. Good set of C18 box pews; C19 choir stalls and organ at west end of
nave; late C19 squire's pew at east end of nave. Traceried wooden chancel
arch, possibly of 1769. Many wall monuments and ledger slabs, mainly to the
North and Gooch families. The main wall monuments are as follows. North
nave: Sir Thomas Gooch (1781), Dame Anne, his wife (1767) and Sir Thomas
Gooch, his son (1826): by Behnes, without figures. North chancel: Francisca
North (1663); Sir Edward North (1708): large, with standing and seated putti;
Louisa Anna Maria Gooch (1838). South chancel: North Carthew (1716) and Sir
Alfred Sherlock Gooch (1809): both cartouches; Sir Thomas Sherlock Gooch
(1851): good, with 3 Grecian figures. At the west end of the nave are 8 good
hatchments.


Listing NGR: TM5116284460

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

Other nearby listed buildings

BritishListedBuildings.co.uk is an independent online resource and is not associated with any government department. All government data published here is used under licence. Please do not contact BritishListedBuildings.co.uk for any queries related to any individual listed building, planning permission related to listed buildings or the listing process itself.

British Listed Buildings is a Good Stuff website.