History in Structure

This site is entirely user-supported. See how you can help.

Church of St Peter

A Grade I Listed Building in Strumpshaw, Norfolk

Approximate Location Map
Large Map »
Street View
Contributor Photos »

Street View is the best available vantage point looking, if possible, towards the location of the building. In some locations, Street View may not give a view of the actual building, or may not be available at all. Where it is not available, the satellite view is shown instead.

Coordinates

Latitude: 52.6164 / 52°36'59"N

Longitude: 1.4688 / 1°28'7"E

OS Eastings: 634916

OS Northings: 307722

OS Grid: TG349077

Mapcode National: GBR XKB.S7G

Mapcode Global: WHMTQ.JHNJ

Entry Name: Church of St Peter

Listing Date: 25 September 1962

Grade: I

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1051500

English Heritage Legacy ID: 228518

Location: Strumpshaw, Broadland, Norfolk, NR13

County: Norfolk

District: Broadland

Civil Parish: Strumpshaw

Traditional County: Norfolk

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Norfolk

Church of England Parish: Strumpshaw and Hassingham with Buckenham

Church of England Diocese: Norwich

Find accommodation in
Lingwood

Listing Text

TG 30 NW STRUMPSHAW NORWICH ROAD (south
side)
7/70
25/9/62 Church of St. Peter.

I

Parish church, mainly of C14 and C15 with some C19 rebuilding. Flint with
limestone dressings; knapped and galleted flintwork on tower. Slate roofs,
continuous over nave and chancel. West tower, nave, chancel, north porch;
C15 west tower (bequests 1485-1487) with diagonal western buttresses with
flushwork panels. 3-light Perpendicular west window. 2-light bell openings.
Small cusped openings on south and west sides. Parapet of stepped battlements
with crocketted pinnacles. Polygonal stair turret on south side. Upper
section of tower arch and drip mould for earlier steeper roof line visible
on east face of tower. South door with moulded brick arch and drip plastered
over, doorway blocked in brick. Nave windows 2 and 3 light Perpendicular,
restored. Chancel has plain lancets and a 2-light 'Y' tracery window at south
east corner. Evidence of a blocked lancet in centre of south wall. C13
Priest's doorway with restored arch. 3-light east window with Perpendicular
tracery. North porch of flint with brick dressings, much restored C19; arch
and niche above in brick with double hollow chamfer. Tall narrow tower arch
now cut by later roof, said to date from 1817. Chancel roof also replaced:
king struts on collars, shallow pitch. Plastered ceiling over nave. Banner
stave locker adjoining north door. Rood loft stair at north east corner.
Good square headed screen, probably early C15 with panel tracery above
crocketted arches : four bays on each side of central arched opening. Much
original colour remains, the lower panels painted alternately red and green
and patterned with floral motifs. Evidence remains that the screen originally
had westward projections to flank nave altars, as at Ranworth (q.v.) In the
chancel south wall a stepped dropped cill sedilia and a good double piscina
with trefoiled heads and a small dragon carved in one of its stiff-leaf stops.
Shallow pointed arch low down in south wall of nave. Some notable wall
monuments : Catharine Nelson +1789; Matthew Barnes +1782 and Anne Barnes +1786;
Edward Smith +1812; Mary Redhead +1811; William Springall +1752, also some
good floor slabs. Octagonal font, C15, bowl carved with alternating roses
and shields, corbel heads supporting bowl with four seated lions against the
stem. Crocketted octagonal conical cover.


Listing NGR: TG3491607722

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

Other nearby listed buildings

BritishListedBuildings.co.uk is an independent online resource and is not associated with any government department. All government data published here is used under licence. Please do not contact BritishListedBuildings.co.uk for any queries related to any individual listed building, planning permission related to listed buildings or the listing process itself.

British Listed Buildings is a Good Stuff website.