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2 Ten Bell Lane

A Grade II Listed Building in Mancroft, Norfolk

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Coordinates

Latitude: 52.6307 / 52°37'50"N

Longitude: 1.2871 / 1°17'13"E

OS Eastings: 622549

OS Northings: 308731

OS Grid: TG225087

Mapcode National: GBR W80.56

Mapcode Global: WHMTM.R43L

Entry Name: 2 Ten Bell Lane

Listing Date: 5 June 1972

Last Amended: 7 January 2015

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1051835

English Heritage Legacy ID: 229638

Location: Norwich, Norfolk, NR2

County: Norfolk

District: Norwich

Civil Parish: Non Civil Parish

District Council Ward: Mancroft

Traditional County: Norfolk

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Norfolk

Church of England Parish: Norwich St Giles

Church of England Diocese: Norwich

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Summary

House; late C17- C18, originally part of No.95 Pottergate (listed at Grade II as C17 with C18 and C19 alterations).

Description

House, formerly a rear wing of No. 95 Pottergate; late C17- C18, renovated in the late-C20 with additions.

MATERIALS: constructed of brick with rendered west elevation; tiled roofs.

EXTERIOR: the section of No. 2 Ten Bell Lane taken from No. 95 Pottergate is of two storeys with an attic and basement. The entrance from Ten Bell Lane has a door with six raised and fielded panels, above which is a three light overlight. The door and its architrave with keystone are set within an C18 doorcase with rusticated piers, above which is a pediment supported on consoles. Above is a sash window with sidelights, a replacement for the twelve paned sash shown on the 1938 photograph. To the south, the section that originally belonged to 95 Pottergate is distinct, the division marked by a higher roof and crow stepped gable. There are three twelve paned sash windows, one to the first floor and two to the ground floor; a continuous storey band runs the length of the west elevation across the return of No.95 Pottergate and No.2 Ten Bell Lane, stopping shortly before the entrance.

The two storey east elevation is of brick, with modern additions and alterations*.

INTERIOR: The front door of No.2 opens onto a passage, immediately to the right of which a short flight of steps rises to a living room; this, the basement below and the first floor room and attic above, were formerly part of No. 95 Pottergate. In the south wall of the living room is a bressumer over a blocked fireplace; below the bressumer a modern fireplace surround has been inserted. To the east of this is an opening containing shelving, but presumably once a door to No. 95 Pottergate. To the east of the steps to the living room are stairs to the basement below; this contains a cast iron fireplace with basket grate, beside which is a cast iron oven door at chest height with small square stoke hole with cast iron door below. A substantial, roughly adzed beam is supported by cast iron pillars.

The first floor bedroom above the living room has a chamfered transverse beam with simple stops. In the now internal east wall beside the stairs from the first floor to the attic is a two light timber mullioned window. The roof has an inserted dormer; the roof structure includes staggered purlins to east and west and principal rafters.

The interior of the east side of the house has been extensively renovated and refurbished*.
*Pursuant to s.1(5A) of the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 (‘the Act’) it is declared that these features are not of special architectural or historic interest and are excluded from the listing.


History

At the time of listing in 1972, No. 2, with Nos. 4 and 6 Ten Bell Lane, formed part of a wholesale warehouse, but in the C19 these had been three discrete properties. The Historic Ordnance Survey (OS) map of 1885 names No.4 as the Anchor public house, so although the OS map does not assign street numbers, the occupiers of the properties to either side of the pub can be identified from the Street Directory for 1883. The property to the north, No. 6, is said to be occupied by Chas Seaman, a silk weaver, while No.2, to the south, at that time a narrow, roughly L-shaped building, was occupied by Wm Gale, clog maker, and in 1896 by a gas fitter named Walter S. Self. In 1907 the plan of the property remained unchanged, but by 1928 it had absorbed a part of No. 95 Pottergate, its neighbour to the south, (listed at Grade II as C17 with C18 and C19 alterations NHLE 1051940). This created a square space with a short wing to the east. Sometime between 1938 and 1957 Nos. 2, 4, and 6 came under single ownership, and appear for the first time on an OS map as a single property.

A photograph of 1938 by George Plunkett shows a gap in the tall plinth below the window closest to the pedimented C18 doorcase to No. 2, indicating there may originally have been a side entrance here to No. 95 Pottergate, and it seems possible that this was the original location of the doorway. Below the window to the south the photograph shows an opening, now blocked, either a window or access for direct deliveries to the cellar. In 1996 there was still access at first floor level between buildings, but the warehouse was subsequently restored to three separate dwellings, No. 2 retaining the addition taken from No. 95 Pottergate.
The 1972 List entry for Nos. 2, 4 & 6 states that it was formerly listed as 'No. 2, Former use unknown, now wholesale warehouse. C17 and C18 Stucco. Pantile roof. 2 storeys. Windows altered. Fine C18 doorcase with pediment and Keystone, console brackets and rusticated surround.'

Reasons for Listing

No.2 Ten Bell Lane, a house of the C17 and C18, is listed at Grade II for the following principal reasons:
* Architectural interest: the west side of the house is of special architectural interest as part of No. 95 Pottergate, with features appropriate to a building of that status, including the crow stepped north gable and front door with handsome pedimented doorcase;
* Interior detail: the four west rooms, which include basement, first and second floors and attic, retain original fabric and detail, including the roof structure;
* Group value: it is historically part of No. 95 Pottergate, listed at Grade II, and has close proximity with other C17 and C18 buildings close by on the north side of Pottergate, including Nos. 97 and 93.

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