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Repton Hall with Prior Overtons Tower, Repton School

A Grade I Listed Building in Repton, Derbyshire

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Coordinates

Latitude: 52.842 / 52°50'31"N

Longitude: -1.5511 / 1°33'3"W

OS Eastings: 430332

OS Northings: 327257

OS Grid: SK303272

Mapcode National: GBR 5DD.YF4

Mapcode Global: WHCG1.4TMN

Entry Name: Repton Hall with Prior Overtons Tower, Repton School

Listing Date: 2 September 1952

Grade: I

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1057669

English Heritage Legacy ID: 82778

Location: Repton, South Derbyshire, Derbyshire, DE65

County: Derbyshire

District: South Derbyshire

Civil Parish: Repton

Built-Up Area: Repton

Traditional County: Derbyshire

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Derbyshire

Church of England Parish: Repton St Wystan

Church of England Diocese: Derby

Find accommodation in
Willington

Listing Text

SK 30/3127
SK 30/3126
6/95
2.9.52

PARISH OF REPTON
WILLINGTON ROAD
(North Side)
Repton Hall with Prior Overton's Tower, Repton School

GV
I

Priors lodgings, converted and enlarged into a private house,
now school. c1438, c1680, extended to east and raised in C19,
extension to west 1884 by John Shaw of Derby. Coursed squared
sandstone, ashlar and red brick. Plain tile roof, various C19
brick stacks. Three storeys. South elevation of nine plus four
bays, and extensive red brick range of 1884 to west not of
special interest. The nine bay part represents the late C17
house. Moulded cornice and first floor band. The ground floor
has a doorway in the second bay from the left, with moulded
architrave and segmental pediment. Raised and fielded panelled
door. To the left a wooden cross window with keyed moulded
stone surround. Similar window to right. To the right again a
glazing bar sash in similar surround, a former doorway with
glazing bar sash in similar surround, two similar glazing bar
sashes and a glazing bar sash in a doorway with similar
surround, and another glazing bar sash. Nine wooden cross
windows above in keyed eared moulded architraves. The four bays
to the right are C19 with glazing bar sashes under plain
lintels. Late C19 tile hung top floor with eight gabled
dormers. Pair of gate piers attached to south after third bay
from left. Square in plan with pilaster strips on the inner
faces with inverted brackets. Moulded caps. The north
elevation has casements, wooden cross windows and sashes of
various dates, either side of Prior Overton's tower. Prior
Overton's tower is all that remains of the Prior's new lodgings
built some time soon after 1437. It is one of the most ornate
pieces of early domestic brick architecture in England, the
style more Hanseatic than English. Ashlar basement with
buttresses with two set-offs. Rising from these are brick
buttresses rising to two corbelled-out polygonal angle turrets,
with one tier of small rectangular slit windows. Between are
two giant blank cusped 2-light arches in two tiers, with two
tiers of cross windows set in, the lower pair with the brick
mullions of the blind arches. Roll moulding to the outer
round-arched order. Parapet corbelled out on two tiers of
billet moudling. Interior: Entrance hall has a pair of Doric
columns, painted stone bolection moulded chimneypiece and
massive moulded beams. Drawing room. Bolection moulded
chimneypiece with moulded cornice, in Hopton Wood stone. Oak
panelling and double cornice. Dining room. Painted panelling,
bolection moulded Hopton Wood chimneypiece. The office (in
Prior Overton's tower) . Four centred arched ashlar
chimneypiece, fine C15 carved beams with ornamental bosses.
Headmaster's Study. Re-used C17 panelling. staircase,
closed string with heavy turned balusters. Staircase window
with enamelled armorial glass of 1813 by William Eginton of
Birmingham. Several upper rooms have remains of late C17
panelling.

Listing NGR: SK3033227257

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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