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A Grade II Listed Building in Lambeth, London

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Latitude: 51.5038 / 51°30'13"N

Longitude: -0.1139 / 0°6'49"W

OS Eastings: 531005

OS Northings: 179999

OS Grid: TQ310799

Mapcode National: GBR LH.L3

Mapcode Global: VHGQZ.ZG5L

Entry Name: WATERLOO STATION (Victory Arch)

Listing Date: 8 March 2002

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1063898

English Heritage Legacy ID: 488532

Location: Lambeth, London, SE1

County: London

District: Lambeth

Electoral Ward/Division: Bishop's

Built-Up Area: Lambeth

Traditional County: Surrey

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Greater London

Church of England Parish: Waterloo St John with St Andrew

Church of England Diocese: Southwark

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Listing Text

TQ 3179

Waterloo Station (Victory Arch)


The Victory or Memorial Arch was built 1919-22. It was designed as the main foot entrance to the station at the head of an impressive flight of steps, most of which is within the building. It is in the form of a triumphal arch some three storeys and attic in height, on the butterfly plan; the main arch being flanked by side bays and with one bay canted wings. It was joined to the existing building on the left by a three bay section with recessed centre and giant order, this is not repeated to the right. Balustraded parapet with attic hidden behind. Stonework with heavy rustication in the centre. Sculpture - Bronze plaques under the arch bear the names of 585 LSWR employees who lost their lives in WWI, but the chief features are two sculptural groups, one dedicated to Bellona and dated 1914 and the other, dated 1918, to Peace, under the names of the greatest fields of battle set around a glazed arch set with a clock in a sunburst, and surmounted on the roof by Britannia. Prominent on the concourse side of the arch is the name of the company. The sculptor was the other wise little known Charles Whiffen. The special significance of the monument within the post-First World War genre is that the LSWR staff themselves were, uniquely, consulted on its design. Pylons with iron lamps flank the staircase.

The rest of the station is not of special architectural or historic interest.

This List entry has been amended to add sources for War Memorials Online and the War Memorials Register. These sources were not used in the compilation of this List entry but are added here as a guide for further reading, 16 February 2017.

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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