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27, Hill Village Road

A Grade II Listed Building in Sutton Coldfield, Birmingham

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Latitude: 52.5894 / 52°35'21"N

Longitude: -1.8299 / 1°49'47"W

OS Eastings: 411620

OS Northings: 299074

OS Grid: SP116990

Mapcode National: GBR 3H0.JP

Mapcode Global: WHCH7.V5SR

Entry Name: 27, Hill Village Road

Listing Date: 4 March 1999

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1067115

English Heritage Legacy ID: 473080

Location: Birmingham, B75

County: Birmingham

Civil Parish: Sutton Coldfield

Built-Up Area: Sutton Coldfield

Traditional County: Warwickshire

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): West Midlands

Church of England Parish: Hill

Church of England Diocese: Birmingham

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Sutton Coldfield

Listing Text

SP 19 NW

Number 27

House, probably formerly an agricultural building, and perhaps maltings. Probably late C17 in origin; the two gabled wings to east, and probably also the two stacks in the original building, introduced in C18.

Sandstone, timber-framing and red brick, the external walls rendered except on the south gable end of the main, house where the sandstone is exposed, roof of tiles. The main house one storey and attic, the east wings two storeys.

Flat-arched entrance in southeast wing; scattered fenestration, principally flat-arched with C19 and early C20 sashes, except for one pointed-arched window on the east front, formerly an entrance. Three gabled dormers to cast front; one stack behind the main ridge, end stacks to the east wings.

The interior has chamfered spine beams to the ground floor of the main house, forming five bays; the floor above has massive cambered tie beams at eaves level, though the southernmost is missing; these are at a relatively low level, suggesting an agricultural use which did not require full-height rooms; it is probable that originally the building had a completely open plan, and the two massive brick stacks between the first and second bay and the fourth and fifth, counting from the south, were probably introduced in the C18; the original beam over the hearth survives in the southeast wing, now with a C19 range; the roof in the attic proper has two pairs of massive principals and, to the north, coupled rafters with no ridge piece.

Listing NGR: SP1162099074

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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