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The Maltings I and II

A Grade II Listed Building in Hadlow, Kent

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Coordinates

Latitude: 51.2237 / 51°13'25"N

Longitude: 0.336 / 0°20'9"E

OS Eastings: 563217

OS Northings: 149761

OS Grid: TQ632497

Mapcode National: GBR NQ7.7R4

Mapcode Global: VHHQ1.RHZR

Entry Name: The Maltings I and II

Listing Date: 25 July 1979

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1070448

English Heritage Legacy ID: 179510

Location: Hadlow, Tonbridge and Malling, Kent, TN11

County: Kent

District: Tonbridge and Malling

Civil Parish: Hadlow

Built-Up Area: Hadlow

Traditional County: Kent

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Kent

Church of England Parish: Hadlow

Church of England Diocese: Rochester

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Listing Text

HADLOW HIGH STREET
(north side)
The Maltings,I and II
7/74

The description shall be amended to read

TQ 63 49 HADLOW HIGH STREET

7/74 The Maltings, I and II

25.7.79

GV II

Former maltings of the Hadlow Brewery. Built in 1859 and circa 1880s, converted
to flats in 1988. Buff-coloured Flemish bond brick with bands of red brick and
red brick dressings, former office front of yellow and red brick with limestone
dressings; slate roof.

Plan: 2 large buildings set adjacent to and at an angle to each other.
Maltings I circa 1880s is end onto the street- on a rough north west - south east
axis. Its front end is more architectural. 2 large square-plan drying kilns on
the back end. Maltings II 1859 is on a more east west axis with 2 similar drying
kilns on the west end. Both are 4 storeys with accommodation in the roofspace.
Exterior: The gable-end wall of Maltings I onto the street has a symmetrical
3-window front in Romanesque style. It is yellow brick with decorative red brick
dressings. 3 full height windows at ground floor level in round-headed arches
under a stone continuous hoodmould centre window is larger and has a stone
keystone. At first floor level a single light round-headed window flanked by
similar 2-light windows under a continuous hoodmould. Similar 2-light window in
the gable end and cogged brick eaves cornice. The left long side (to south west)
is 12 bays (including the kiln) divided by brick pilasters and has a corbelled
eaves cornice including cogged bricks. Other side is plainer with a 3-window
wide bay projecting towards the rear; full height and gabled. It was formerly a
loading bay. Eaves cornice this side includes brick dentil frieze. Windows in
segmental head arches. Many are new, (that is to say from 1988) and others have
been altered. They contain casements with no glazing bars. Large low-pitch
gabled dormers from 1988. The former drying kilns have tall pyramid roofs
surmounted by cowls. Maltings II is in the same style and has been converted in
the same way.

Interiors: Not inspected.

The Maltings form part of a group of varied listed buildings on the western
approach to Hadlow. They are large buildings and very important to the town
and indeed to the area which is still a major producer of hops.

------------------------------------

HADLOW HIGH STREET (north side)
TQ 63 49
7/74 The Maltings, I and II
25.7.79

GV II

Former maltings of the Hadlow Brewery. Circa 1845, converted to flats in
1988. Buff-coloured Flemish bond brick with bands of red brick and red brick
dressings, former office front of yellow and red brick with limestone
dressings; slate roof.

Plan: 2 large buildings set adjacent to and at an angle to each other.
Maltings I is end onto the street on a rough north west - south east axis.
Its front end is more architectural and probably was built as the brewery
offices. 2 large square-plan drying kilns on the back end. Maltings II is on
a more east west axis with 2 similar drying kilns on the west end. Both are 4
storeys with accommodation in the roofspace.

Exterior: The gable-end wall of Maltings I onto the street has a symmetrical
3-window front in Romanesque style. It is yellow brick with decorative red
brick dressings. 3 full height windows at ground floor level in round-headed
arches under a stone continuous hoodmould centre window is larger and has a
stone keystone. At first floor level a single light round-headed window
flanked by similar 2-light windows under a continuous hoodmould. Similar 2-
light window in the gable end and cogged brick eaves cornice. The left long
side (to south west) is 12 bays (including the kiln) divided by brick
pilasters and has a corbelled eaves cornice including cogged bricks. Other
side is plainer with a 3-window wide bay projecting towards the rear; full
height and gabled. It was formerly a loading bay. Eaves cornice this side
includes brick dentil frieze. Windows in segmental head arches. Many are
new, (that is to say from 1988) and others have been altered. They contain
casements with no glazing bars. Large low-pitch gabled dormers from 1988.
The former drying kilns have tall pyramid roofs surmounted by cowls. Maltings
II is in the same style and has been converted in the same way.

Interiors: Not inspected.

The Maltings form part of a group of varied listed buildings on the western
approach to Hadlow. They are large buildings and very important to the town
and indeed to the area which is still a major producer of hops.


Listing NGR: TQ6321749761

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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