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Church of Saint Bartholomew

A Grade II* Listed Building in Aldbrough, East Riding of Yorkshire

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Coordinates

Latitude: 53.8298 / 53°49'47"N

Longitude: -0.111 / 0°6'39"W

OS Eastings: 524422

OS Northings: 438718

OS Grid: TA244387

Mapcode National: GBR WSN4.RV

Mapcode Global: WHHGF.8ZDV

Entry Name: Church of Saint Bartholomew

Listing Date: 16 December 1966

Grade: II*

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1083529

English Heritage Legacy ID: 166464

Location: Aldbrough, East Riding of Yorkshire, HU11

County: East Riding of Yorkshire

Civil Parish: Aldbrough

Built-Up Area: Aldbrough

Traditional County: Yorkshire

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): East Riding of Yorkshire

Church of England Parish: Aldbrough St Bartholomew

Church of England Diocese: York

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Listing Text

ALDBROUGH CHURCH STREET
TA 23 NW
(north side)
3/6 Church of Saint
Bartholomew
16.12.66
II*
Church. C11 or earlier nave, C12 chancel, early C13 tower: considerably
rebuilt in late C19. Coursed cobbles with freestone dressing and red brick
to tower parapet, slate roof. 3-stage west tower, 4 bay aisled nave with
south porch, 2-bay chancel with north chapel. West tower: moulded plinth,
angle buttresses, side-alternate quoins, scroll moulded strings between
stages. Lancets to first and second stage. Third stage north elevation has
unaltered belfry openings of 2 pointed lights with mid-wall shaft under
round roll-moulded arch on nook shafts. Remaining elevations have pointed
3-light windows with Perpendicular tracery. Dentilled brick parapet. Nave:
buttresses with offsets. Two 3-light square-headed windows with cusped ogee
tracery under hood-moulds to west and centre; similar 2-light windows to
east and to clerestory. Pointed south door with continuous chamfer.
Chancel: 2-light square-headed window with cusped ogee tracery to east:
pointed priests' door with continuous wave moulding under reused arch with
chevron ornament to left. Over the window is the head to a former slit
window decorated with affronted beasts and geometrical ornament. 4-light
east window with C19 tracery under elliptical head. Interior: early C13
pointed tower arch of 3 orders (with rolls on hollow chamfers to nave) under
stopped hood-mould; moulded capitals, filleted shaft to responds, water-
holding bases. Late C19 north and south arcades of round and pointed arches
on circular piers with shallow moulded bases. South aisle, north wall: Cll
circular Anglo-Saxon sundial with inscription:
'Ulf who ordered this church to be built for his own and Gunware's souls'
and small figure of Roman soldier, perhaps C12. North chancel chapel:
pointed C14 arch with chamfered imposts. Chest tomb with effigy of Sir John
de Mulsa died 1377: shields and quatrefoils under billet ornament to chest.
Late C14 effigy of a woman under pointed chamfered arch into chancel.
Blocked round-headed slit window with spiral ornament to chancel north wall.
C15 font, disused, to nave west end: shallow basin on octagonal pillar with
high moulded base said to have been brought from the Church of Saint Hilda,
Cowden Parva, now lost to the sea.


Listing NGR: TA2442238718

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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