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Church of St Peter and St Paul

A Grade I Listed Building in Kimpton, Hampshire

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Coordinates

Latitude: 51.2181 / 51°13'5"N

Longitude: -1.5988 / 1°35'55"W

OS Eastings: 428114

OS Northings: 146626

OS Grid: SU281466

Mapcode National: GBR 612.JLJ

Mapcode Global: VHC2Q.7NM1

Entry Name: Church of St Peter and St Paul

Listing Date: 21 December 1960

Grade: I

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1093222

English Heritage Legacy ID: 140080

Location: Kimpton, Test Valley, Hampshire, SP11

County: Hampshire

District: Test Valley

Civil Parish: Kimpton

Traditional County: Hampshire

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Hampshire

Church of England Parish: Kimpton St Peter and St Paul

Church of England Diocese: Winchester

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Listing Text

SU 2846 KIMPTON KIMPTON

7/17 Church of St. Peter
& St. Paul
21.12.60 I

Parish church. C13, C14, C15, C18, 1837, restorations of 1894 and 1896.
Cruciform church with a south aisle to the nave, south porch, and western tower.
Flint & stone rubble, flint and brick, and a tile roof. Single cell nave and
chancel of c1220 with lancets in the chancel, and blocked north door in the nave;
transepts of the C14 (the north earlier) with Decorated traceried windows and
ogee cusped openings (2 squints). C14 arcade of 3 bays with a narrow south aisle,
with wall restored in the C18 (exterior plaque dated 1702) with 2 small windows.
Tile roof of continuous ridge, slightly-lower transept roof, low eaves to the south
aisle. Walls of flint and stone rubble with stone dressings, cement render to the
chancel which has clasped buttresses to the middle height at the eastern corners.
The tower of 1837 is of 2 main stages, with a parapet with central gablets to each
face, flat buttresses with shallow steps, coupled lancets to the bell stage and a
larger lancet west window: the features of the walling are expressed in red brick
work with complex intermediate patterns of flush flint panelling. Windows are a
mixture of lancets, coupled lights with reticulate trace , small lights of ogee
form with cusps, and 2 perpendicular windows (in the nave . Within, there is a
Gothic cusped tomb recess in the north wall of the chancel near the altar, and a
similar recess (altered by the insertion of a window) in the south wall of the
south transept; there are piscinas to the chancel and south transept. The floor
of the chancel has many monumental slabs from the late 17th to the early C19, and
there are several wall monuments within the same date range. The north wall of
the north transept (the Shoddesdon Chapel) has a small altar tomb (with inlays for
brasses now gone) partly buried in the wall, and above is a late-Gothic stone frame
with decorated head and panelled sides, enclosing 3 brasses (of Robert Thornborough
and his 2 wives) and an inscription brass dated 1522. The north wall of the nave
contains a painted board of the Royal Coat of Arms (of George III 1812) and the
west end of the aisle has a Victorian font. The gable to the south porch has
diagonal boarding above a brick face.


Listing NGR: SU2821446647

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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