History in Structure

This site is entirely user-supported. See how you can help.

Church of St Mary of the Assumption

A Grade I Listed Building in Froyle, Hampshire

Approximate Location Map
Large Map »
Street View
Contributor Photos »

Street View is the best available vantage point looking, if possible, towards the location of the building. In some locations, Street View may not give a view of the actual building, or may not be available at all. Where it is not available, the satellite view is shown instead.

Coordinates

Latitude: 51.1801 / 51°10'48"N

Longitude: -0.9203 / 0°55'12"W

OS Eastings: 475568

OS Northings: 142871

OS Grid: SU755428

Mapcode National: GBR C90.VJG

Mapcode Global: VHDY6.0LBQ

Entry Name: Church of St Mary of the Assumption

Listing Date: 31 July 1963

Grade: I

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1094095

English Heritage Legacy ID: 141972

Location: Froyle, East Hampshire, Hampshire, GU34

County: Hampshire

District: East Hampshire

Civil Parish: Froyle

Traditional County: Hampshire

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Hampshire

Church of England Parish: Froyle The Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Church of England Diocese: Winchester

Find accommodation in
Lower Froyle

Listing Text

SU 14 SE FROYLE UPPER FROYLE

5/44 Church of St Mary of the
Assumption
31/07/63
I

Parish church. Early C14, 1722, 1812, with Victorian restoration and fittings.
Stone and brick walls, tile and slate roof. The church was rebuilt in the 1st
half of the C14, and this part survives as the aisleless chancel; the steeple was
demolished 1722 and replaced by the present west tower, and the nave was rebuilt
in 1812. The chancel of 3 bays has a tile roof, and walls of chalkstone, with
diagonal stepped buttresses at the east end and 2 south-side buttresses; the
windows are coupled lights with simple tracery (one Perpendicular on the south
side) and the east window is the original, of 5 lights with Decorated
(reticulated tracery), containing a fine series of contemporary armorial glass,
representing descendants of Edward I. Inside, on the north side there is an
Easter-Sepulchre and low cambered tomb arch, and on the south side a C15
5-cusped piscina; the floor has many fine lettered tomb slabs of black marble, and
the Victorian organ is arranged in 2 frames on the south side. The nave of 3
bays is arranged with 2 storeys of windows, and has a low-pitched slate roof,
brick walls in Flemish bond with blue headers, plinth, with "Gothic" traceried
coupled stone lights, projections on the north and south contain the porch and
vestry. Within the nave there are 2 wall monuments, 8 hatchments, the painted
Royal Coat of Arms of George III, a brass eagle lectern, stone pulpit of 1876,
font of 1864, a brass chandelier of 1716, and a west-end gallery supported on 4
thin cast-iron columns; the west door has above it a "Della Robbia" style
faience sculpture. The brick tower (1722) of 3 storeys has blunt corner
pinnacles, a plain parapet, cambered arches to the several openings, diagonal
stepped buttresses; near the north door several bricks are inscribed with
initials, and one is dated 1744.


Listing NGR: SU7572943163

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

Other nearby listed buildings

BritishListedBuildings.co.uk is an independent online resource and is not associated with any government department. All government data published here is used under licence. Please do not contact BritishListedBuildings.co.uk for any queries related to any individual listed building, planning permission related to listed buildings or the listing process itself.

British Listed Buildings is a Good Stuff website.