History in Structure

This site is entirely user-supported. See how you can help.

Hayne Farmhouse

A Grade II Listed Building in Uffculme, Devon

Approximate Location Map
Large Map »
Street View
Contributor Photos »

Street View is the best available vantage point looking, if possible, towards the location of the building. In some locations, Street View may not give a view of the actual building, or may not be available at all. Where it is not available, the satellite view is shown instead.

Coordinates

Latitude: 50.8831 / 50°52'59"N

Longitude: -3.258 / 3°15'28"W

OS Eastings: 311598

OS Northings: 110040

OS Grid: ST115100

Mapcode National: GBR LT.SQFQ

Mapcode Global: FRA 462R.SMY

Entry Name: Hayne Farmhouse

Listing Date: 15 April 1987

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1106512

English Heritage Legacy ID: 95788

Location: Uffculme, Mid Devon, Devon, EX15

County: Devon

District: Mid Devon

Civil Parish: Uffculme

Traditional County: Devon

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Devon

Church of England Parish: Uffculme St Mary Virgin

Church of England Diocese: Exeter

Find accommodation in
Dunkeswell

Listing Text

ST 11 SW
5/133

UFFCULME
Hayne Farmhouse

II

Farmhouse. Probably late C15 or early C16, with later modifications. Roughcast
cob; gable-end and half-hipped thatched roof. Originally a 3-room, through-passage
plan house of jointed cruck construction, the service end,(extended by the addition
of another room, probably in the C17), to the left of the passage. The hall and
service end were open to the roof which is smoke-blackened. The inner room was of 2
storeys from the beginning, divided from the hall of a closed truss. A first floor
window in this partition (i.e. between hall and 'solar') noticed by Commander
Williams in 1975, has been removed. The inner room was unheated; inserted axial
stack backing on to the passage heats hall; another axial (originally an end) stack
heats service end; internal end stack heats service end extension. All with brick
shafts. 2 storeys.
Exterior Front: irregular 4 window range; all 3-light C19 casement windows to first
floor; ground floor: 2 entrances, the right-hand doorway is almost centrally placed
and leads into the passage between the service room and the service end extension
(half-glazed door with corrugated iron canopy). Otherwise C19 and C20 2 and 3-light
casement windows. Rear: with 2 late lean-tos; rear door to through-passage with a
debased 4-centred arch, the centre rising almost like a low pediment, chamfered and
pegged (and apparently similar to certain doorways in Somerset). Another door to
extreme left of elevation; planked and studded. 2 and 3-light casement windows
elsewhere.
Interior: Hall with deeply chamfered unstopped intersecting ceiling beams forming 6
panes; partition between hall and inner room now of rubble (but possibly originally
a timber screen, as Commander Williams suggests). Plank and muntin screen between
through-passage and service end; service end with roughly chamfered cross ceiling
beam. Axial ceiling beam to service end extension, chamfered, with run out stops to
one end only. Roof: 3 jointed cruck trusses, cranked collars, morticed and pegged
at apex with diagonal ridge piece (Alcock type F2); service end and hall completely
sooted with rafters battening and smoke-blackened thatch intact. Higher end clean,
with hip cruck. Commander Williams was unable closely to inspect the lower end of
the medieval roof and this does not retain its hip cruck; the cob stack inserted at
this point has been heavily stained by soot from the smoke-blackened roof above.
Reference: a full report with plan and sections by Commander Williams, June 1975,
is in the NMR.

Listing NGR: ST1157610042

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

Selected Sources

Source links go to a search for the specified title at Amazon. Availability of the title is dependent on current publication status. You may also want to check AbeBooks, particularly for older titles.

Other nearby listed buildings

BritishListedBuildings.co.uk is an independent online resource and is not associated with any government department. All government data published here is used under licence. Please do not contact BritishListedBuildings.co.uk for any queries related to any individual listed building, planning permission related to listed buildings or the listing process itself.

British Listed Buildings is a Good Stuff website.