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Stone Lodge and Threshers Barn

A Grade II Listed Building in Harberton, Devon

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Coordinates

Latitude: 50.4085 / 50°24'30"N

Longitude: -3.7391 / 3°44'20"W

OS Eastings: 276520

OS Northings: 57960

OS Grid: SX765579

Mapcode National: GBR QJ.8R43

Mapcode Global: FRA 371Z.53Y

Entry Name: Stone Lodge and Threshers Barn

Listing Date: 26 April 1993

Last Amended: 12 January 2010

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1108221

English Heritage Legacy ID: 101311

Location: Harberton, South Hams, Devon, TQ9

County: Devon

District: South Hams

Civil Parish: Harberton

Traditional County: Devon

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Devon

Church of England Parish: Harberton

Church of England Diocese: Exeter

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Listing Text

HARBERTON
SX75NE
5/407 EASTLEIGH
Barn about 20 metres
SW of East Leigh
Farmhouse

GV II

Stone Lodge and Threshers Barn, (formerly the Barn 20m SW of East Leigh Farmhouse), is a South Hams bank barn converted into two residential dwellings and dates from the C18 with C19 and C20 alterations.

MATERIALS: The building is constructed of slate rubble with red brick detailing and a modern slate roof.

PLAN: The barn is rectangular in plan and is built into the bank at its north-western end. The building is now divided into two dwellings which are accessed via the north-western gable elevation at first floor level and via the south-western elevation at ground floor level.

EXTERIOR: The building is of two storeys. The majority of the openings are situated within the south-west elevation and consist of five window openings on the first floor and five on the ground floor. All window openings contain modern casement windows. To the south east of this elevation are large openings within the ground and first floor, separated by red brick voussoirs. The north-east elevation faces the courtyard fronting East Leigh Farmhouse and contains three openings with timber plank doors and brick arches. In addition to the three doors a narrow ventilation shaft is situated at first floor level to the south east of the elevation. Internally all of these openings have been filled by concrete blocks.

INTERIOR: Only the house to the north west was inspected (2009) but it is clear the whole building has been subject to alteration since its conversion into two separate residential dwellings. The north-western dwelling is entirely plastered and painted internally but retains a nailed scissor-truss roof.

HISTORY: The barn at East Leigh Farmhouse dates to the C18 with C19 alterations. The building was converted into a residential dwelling circa 1996-7. The first edition Ordnance Survey map of 1886 illustrates the site with East Leigh Farmhouse to the north east and the barn to the south west. The barn has smaller structures aligned at right angles to the main barn attached to both the north and south fa├žades. The building to the north has been demolished but the structure to the south remains extant.

REASONS FOR DESIGNATION
Stone Lodge and Threshers Barn, (formerly the Barn 20m SW of East Leigh Farmhouse), Harberton is listed at Grade II, for the following principal reasons:
* It is a good example of a South Hams bank barn dating originally from the C18
* The north-east elevation remains largely intact and retains C18 and C19 fabric
* Despite alterations associated with its conversion to residential use, its form and function as a bank barn remain readily legible


Listing NGR: SX7652057964

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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