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Cock and Bell

A Grade II* Listed Building in High Easter, Essex

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Coordinates

Latitude: 51.8078 / 51°48'28"N

Longitude: 0.3494 / 0°20'57"E

OS Eastings: 562064

OS Northings: 214742

OS Grid: TL620147

Mapcode National: GBR NH2.R3H

Mapcode Global: VHJJM.0TJH

Entry Name: Cock and Bell

Listing Date: 7 February 1952

Last Amended: 20 September 1985

Grade: II*

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1112509

English Heritage Legacy ID: 121364

Location: High Easter, Uttlesford, Essex, CM1

County: Essex

District: Uttlesford

Civil Parish: High Easter

Built-Up Area: High Easter

Traditional County: Essex

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Essex

Church of England Parish: High Easter St Mary the Virgin

Church of England Diocese: Chelmsford

Find accommodation in
Good Easter

Listing Text

TL 61 SW HIGH EASTER THE STREET
(east side)

3/46 Cock and Bell
7/2/52 (Formerly listed as Cock
and Bell Inn)
GV II*

Public house. C.1400 and C16. Timber framed and plastered but with frame
exposed on front and north flank. Roofs are gabled and of peg tile. Of 2
storeys and of 'H' plan form with crosswings at north and south ends. North
crosswing is jettied on north and west faces with a dragon post with moulded
capital, original jetty brackets and double bracing on the front. A 3 light
window on the corner has glazed hollow chamfered mullions. The 'hall' block is
contemporary with this and was formerly jettied along its front. This part is
now concealed by a parapetted single storey infill block of white plastered
brick. The south C16 crosswing has exposed framing showing cills of former pair
of oriel windows and 2 original jetty brackets. On the upper floor flank an
arch headed window opening is now blocked with plaster. A large stack projects
through the flat roofed extension against the flank of this wing. Windows are a
mixture of C18 double hung sash windows with small panes and C20 casements.
Under the north jetty is a canted C18 bay window of double hung sashes.
Internally, the north crosswing is of 2 bays with chamfered girts with a
cambered central tie beam on knee brackets and a crown post roof with
longitudinal braces. In the upper floor a narrow arch headed door leads to the
first floor chamber or the hall. This appears to be contemporary and similar to
the crosswing whichhas soffit tennoned floor joists and a possibly original rear
lean-to. This curious structure is of one very large bay with traces of old
floor opening for former smoke hood. The south crosswing of the C16 has a
moulded and arch headed parlour door and moulded bridging joists on moulded
impost blocks. This wing is of 3 bays and the rear chamber has another blocked
arch headed window to the rear yard. To the rear of the main building is a
range of attached 2 and single storey outbuildings some with pantile and some
with peg tile roofs. A single storey C20 block with gable peg tile roof is
attached to the rear of the north wing. RCHM 13.


Listing NGR: TL6206414742

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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