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Hubbard's Hall

A Grade II Listed Building in Harlow, Essex

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Coordinates

Latitude: 51.773 / 51°46'22"N

Longitude: 0.1492 / 0°8'57"E

OS Eastings: 548379

OS Northings: 210440

OS Grid: TL483104

Mapcode National: GBR LDK.VYT

Mapcode Global: VHHM7.JPQP

Entry Name: Hubbard's Hall

Listing Date: 23 December 1983

Last Amended: 26 April 1984

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1123949

English Heritage Legacy ID: 118128

Location: Harlow, Essex, CM17

County: Essex

District: Harlow

Town: Harlow

Electoral Ward/Division: Old Harlow

Traditional County: Essex

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Essex

Church of England Parish: Harlow St Mary and St Hugh with St John the Baptist

Church of England Diocese: Chelmsford

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Listing Text

TL 484 104 MATCHING Hubbard's Hall
(formerly listed under
2/36 Churchgate Street)
23.12.83
GV II

Manor house, c.1400, extended at various periods up to the C20. Timber framed,
red brick, English and Flemish bond, roofed with handmade red clay tiles. Hall
of 3 bays aligned approx. N-S with cross-entry and spere truss at S end,
c.1400. Inserted axial chimney stack in middle bay of hall, C16. N crosswing,
c.1600, with external chimney stack on N side. S crosswing, early C17,
overlapping S end of hall by approx. 2 metres, with chimney stack near the
middle. Parallel N-S range to the E, C17/18, and extra crosswing S of the S
crosswing, C17/18. Large reception wing added to NE, and service quarters to SE
by Clough Williams-Ellis, 1934. Single storey flat-roofed extension to N and W
of N crosswing, C19/20. Originally the main entrance was to the W at the S end
of the hall; the alterations of 1934 provided a new entrance to the N. W
elevation of hall and first 2 crosswings faced with red brick, English bond,
with moulded stone coping on parapet and gables, C17, and minor alterations in
flettons. The gables of the crosswings project slightly, indicating the
probability of underbuilt jetties. 4-panel door with upper panels glazed,
scattered fenestration consisting of C18 and C19 double-hung sash windows and
one tripartite sash window. Round windows with crossed glazing bars in each
gable, the southern one blind. Gabled dormer in N bay of hall. W end of
additional S crosswing weatherboarded. Internally the framing is almost wholly
concealed. Part of one arched brace to the main tiebeam of the hall is visible
from the ground floor, and another section of tiebeam and brace is visible
within a first floor cupboard. The roof of the hall is of crownpost
construction, with collar braces (soulaces) to every rafter couple, all timbers
heavily smoke-blackened. The crownpost of the main truss is octagonal with
moulded capital and base and 4 arched braces, of which one is severed for the
inserted chimney stack immediately to the S. N of this truss the hall roof is
partly rebuilt with clasped purlins, with an attic inserted, lit by the dormer
already mentioned. The crownpost of the spere truss is plain, very tall, with
short arched braces to ech side and one axial brace to the N; there never was a
brace to the S. S of the spere truss the roof of the S crosswing impinges on
the hall roof, leaving only the collar purlin present. Re-used timbers from the
medieval hall are present in the roof, including a section of moulded wallplate
and a large moulded mullion from the main window. The crosswing roofs are of
clasped purlin construction. The hall is of exceptional size, approx. 11.88
metres long by 7.92 metres wide, height not measured but sufficient for 2
generous storeys and an attic, comparable with the hall of Harlowbury, 1.8 km.
to the NNE, of which it was a dependent manor, both held by the Abbot of
Edmundsbury. Hubbard's Hall was in the parish of Harlow until 1946. L. H.
Bateman (ed): History of Harlow, 1969, 41. Many of the walls have a panelled
dado, late C18, and above it fabric stretched on a rear frame, a rare survival,
covered with wallpaper.


Listing NGR: TL4837910440

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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