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Church of Saint Paul

A Grade II* Listed Building in Healey, North Yorkshire

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Coordinates

Latitude: 54.2214 / 54°13'17"N

Longitude: -1.7209 / 1°43'15"W

OS Eastings: 418294

OS Northings: 480670

OS Grid: SE182806

Mapcode National: GBR JMFM.7H

Mapcode Global: WHC7C.J5Q3

Entry Name: Church of Saint Paul

Listing Date: 9 August 1966

Grade: II*

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1132072

English Heritage Legacy ID: 325017

Location: Healey, Harrogate, North Yorkshire, HG4

County: North Yorkshire

District: Harrogate

Civil Parish: Healey

Traditional County: Yorkshire

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): North Yorkshire

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Listing Text

HEALEY

1159/2/28 MAIN STREET
06-JUL-04 (North side)
CHURCH OF SAINT PAUL

II*
Church. 1848 by E B Lamb. Coursed squared stone with ashlar dressings,
Welsh slate roof. Nave with south porch, central tower with transepts,
chancel. Decorated style. Nave: 3 bays. Plinth. Offset diagonal buttress
at west end, offset angle buttresses divide bays, all with pinnacles. 2-
light pointed-arch cusped windows with hood-moulds. West bay has gabled
porch with chamfered pointed-arched doorway with hood-mould. Chamfered
coping and hood-mould. Parapet with chamfered coping. Tower has offset
angle buttresses and 2-light pointed-arch cusped windows, cornice, stone
broach spire with 4 lucarnes. Transepts: offset angle buttresses, round
chamfered window, band, parapet with chamfered coping, flat roofs. Chancel:
2 bays, similar to nave, but windows are single-light. Interior: crossing
has 4 narrow tower arches; in the corners are heavy, gradually-projecting
rusticated squinches lead up to tower, a second set higher up lead up to
spire. Stone altar rail with trefoil cutouts and central cast iron gates, wooden pews with carved ends, choir stalls, pulpit and font, all by Lamb. Timber framed roof with decoratively carved scissor trusses. Stained glass window on north side commissioned by Lamb and bears his cypher and 1848 date, west window also probably by Lamb, east by Sir Robert Frankland-Russell.

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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