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Scar House

A Grade II Listed Building in Buckden, North Yorkshire

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Coordinates

Latitude: 54.2056 / 54°12'20"N

Longitude: -2.122 / 2°7'19"W

OS Eastings: 392141

OS Northings: 478875

OS Grid: SD921788

Mapcode National: GBR FMMT.D5

Mapcode Global: WHB61.CKS9

Entry Name: Scar House

Listing Date: 10 September 1954

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1132212

English Heritage Legacy ID: 324624

Location: Buckden, Craven, North Yorkshire, BD23

County: North Yorkshire

District: Craven

Civil Parish: Buckden

Traditional County: Yorkshire

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): North Yorkshire

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Deepdale

Listing Text

SD 97 NW BUCKDEN HUBBERHOLME

6/37 Scar House

10.9.54

- II

House. Dated 1697 for James Tennant but with probably earlier C17 and C18
remains; the front wall rebuilt and plan altered 1876 for John William
Ramsden of Buckden House. Coursed limestone rubble, graduated stone slate
roof. 2 storeys, 3 bays. Quoins. A half-glazed C20 door to right of centre
in a rusticated quoined surround having pulvinated frieze, moulded cornice
over a stone date plaque with " T " in raised letters and 4-petal flower
I A
1698
motif. A plaque above has in raised letters "REBUILT" Mullioned windows
JWR
1876
of 2, 4, and 4 lights to each floor. Stone gutter brackets, shaped
kneelers, gable copings, corniced end stacks. Rear: C17 recessed chamfered
mullions of 3 and 5 lights to ground floor and 3 and 4 lights above; there
is a large rectangular stair window centre with C20 glazing and below it a
blocked round arched single-light window. Left return: a C20 glazed door
in chamfered quoined surround with cambered head, left. Right return:
remains of plinth; 2 low windows with reused or altered C17 surrounds.
Interior: the front door opens into a narrow passage, the left wall an
inserted partition, with door into left and right rooms; a thick cross
wall divides the front room from the rear entrance lobby left, central 1876
staircase, and pantry/buttery right. Ground floor left - the main living
room has a large fireplace with chamfered voussoirs of an archway to left,
now with a 4-panel door into a small storeroom with stone shelves. The
fireplace has an inner arch with finely worked cyma mouldings to the
voussoirs and jambs. The front parlour, right, has an inserted partition
wall with built-in cupboard, the partition creating a narrow 'toolroom' to
the rear, between the parlour and rear dairy, which has a stone salting
slab inscribed " IT 1694". The house was the property of the Tennant
family in the C17; George Fox preached there in 1652. The Inventory of
James Tennant, the builder of the earliest remains surviving, is dated 1719
and refers to the main chambers on 2 floors and garrets, probably in the
roof. K.Baird, A Study of Vernacular Buildings in Buckden and
Langstrothdale, M.A. Dissertation, University of Manchester, 1987.
A. RaistricK, The Dalesman, 1946


Listing NGR: SD9214178875

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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