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7-9 Coll Place, including boundary walls and associated ashes place, former privy, and gate piers

A Grade II Listed Building in Wibsey, Bradford

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Coordinates

Latitude: 53.763 / 53°45'46"N

Longitude: -1.7629 / 1°45'46"W

OS Eastings: 415727

OS Northings: 429652

OS Grid: SE157296

Mapcode National: GBR JHX.0M

Mapcode Global: WHC9G.WPP2

Entry Name: 7-9 Coll Place, including boundary walls and associated ashes place, former privy, and gate piers

Listing Date: 21 December 1977

Last Amended: 24 December 2015

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1133231

English Heritage Legacy ID: 336318

Location: Bradford, BD6

County: Bradford

Electoral Ward/Division: Wibsey

Parish: Non Civil Parish

Built-Up Area: Bradford

Traditional County: Yorkshire

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): West Yorkshire

Church of England Parish: Low Moor

Church of England Diocese: Leeds

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Summary

Terraced cottages, c1830/40, with later alterations. Millstone grit 'bricks', stone slate roofs, 2-storeys.

Description

Terraced cottages, c1830/40, with later alterations. Millstone grit 'bricks' with painted-ashlar dressings, stone slate roofs, 2-storeys.

PLAN: 7-9 Coll Place is a group of three terraced cottages lying to the left of centre of a multiphase terrace known as Coll Place; no.7 is located to the right in the group of three, no.8 to the centre and no.7 to the left.

EXTERIOR: 7-9 Coll Place is set back slightly from the rest of the Coll Place terrace. The three cottages are in-fill but are not attached to nos.1-6 and nos.10-13 to the right (north-east) and left (south-west) sides respectively; a slender gap is visible between the properties. All three cottages have linear yards/gardens set in front, which are enclosed by low millstone grit 'brick' walls with flat copings. The garden wall and gate slab-piers to the front of no.9 have been demolished and replaced by modern timber fencing and a gate, which are excluded from the listing. No.7 retains its outdoor coal hole/ash place structure and outdoor toilet/privy, the latter incorporating modern glass bricks to two of the walls. The 2-bay cottages have a bracketed eaves and rendered ridge stacks, and no.7 has a later C19, 2-storey single-bay extension attached in front of the right bay.

Each cottage has a doorway with a plain painted-ashlar surround on the front (south-east) elevation; that to no.7 is set to the south-west gable-end return of the extension. Each doorway contains a modern door* (the doors are not of special interest), with both timber and uPVC being used. The windows all have painted-ashlar sills and lintels, and no.7's 2-light windows retain their mullions on both floors of the left bay. Both nos.8 and 9 have a single-light window above left of the doorway and larger windows to the left bay that were originally 3-light mullioned windows; the mullions to the windows of no.8 have been completely removed on both floors and only one mullion survives to the ground-floor window of no.9, which has been enlarged to add an additional light. Nos.8 and 9 have uPVC glazing*, whilst no.7 has late-C20 timber glazing*; this later glazing is not of special interest. No.7's late-C19 extension has a single window to each floor with late-C20 glazing.

The rear (north-west) elevation has single light windows to the ground floor and 2-light square mullioned windows to the first floor (the right light of that to no.9 has been blocked up). Later windows have been added to each property on both floors.

INTERIOR: internally all three cottages have been modernised to varying degrees.

No.7: the entrance to no.7 leads into the ground floor of the front extension, which contains a modern kitchen. A chimneybreast and a cast-iron range that were originally present have both since been removed. The cottage's original main entrance doorway is now an internal doorway leading into the main ground-floor room and the stair. Originally there was a stone stair that rose from the front of the cottage up towards the rear, but this has been removed and replaced by a modern timber stair* (not of special interest) that now rises in the opposite direction from the rear of the cottage up towards the front. A wall between the ground-floor room and the stair has also been removed and the original door access to the cellar stair has been lost and replaced by a floor hatch, which provides access to a very small cellar underneath part of the ground-floor room. The ground-floor room has a stone-flag floor (hidden under later coverings) and machine-cut ceiling beams flanking the chimneybreast. The fireplace opening has been enlarged/re-opened and a modern bressumer and tiling installed, along with buttress-style stone supports. On the first floor later partitions* have been inserted to create a landing area and additional rooms, all with modern doors* (the later partitions and doors are not of special interest). The ceilings and chimneybreasts have been removed, and machine-cut side purlins and rafters are visible. Some original floorboards survive.

No.8: the interior of no.8 contains modern doors*, which are not of special interest, and the ground-floor room has been partitioned to create a galley kitchen at the rear. The ground-floor room has a modern fireplace* (not of special interest) and machine-cut ceiling beams flanking the chimneybreast. The modern fireplace possibly conceals an original stone fireplace lintel behind. The original stone stair survives in its original position with a modern carpet covering. A stone stair underneath the main stair flight leads down into a cellar with stone and brick shelving. Modern partition walls*, which are not of special interest, have been inserted on the first floor to create a landing and additional rooms, and machine-cut side purlins are visible. A front bedroom contains a coated/varnished stone surround with a cast-iron hob grate and original floorboards.

No.9: the interior of no.9 is similar to no.8 and also contains modern doors*, which are not of special interest. The ground-floor room, which has been partitioned to create a galley kitchen at the rear, also contains a modern fireplace* (not of special interest) and has machine-cut ceiling beams flanking the chimneybreast. The modern fireplace possibly conceals an original stone fireplace lintel behind. The original stone stair also survives in its original position with a modern carpet covering; part of the stair wall has been removed on the first-floor landing (itself a modern creation) to open up the space. A stone stair underneath the main stair flight accessed through an original 3-plank and batten door leads down to a small cellar with stone and brick shelving. The first floor has been modernised and partitioned* (the modern partitions are not of special interest), although a chimneybreast survives in the front bedroom.

* Pursuant to s.1 (5A) of the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 ('the Act') it is declared that these aforementioned features are not of special architectural or historic interest.

History

At the time of the original listing in 1977 7-9 Coll Place were recorded as being of early-C19 date. However, deeds reveal that they were constructed in the early-mid C19 (c1830/40) as in-fill to complete the terrace of Coll Place. The terrace was possibly originally associated with a worsted mill known as Coll Mill that existed to the rear alongside Halifax Road until the 1970s.

Reasons for Listing

7-9 Coll Place are listed at Grade II for the following principal reasons:

* Architectural interest: the cottages retain their overall form and vernacular character and they form part of an identifiable group of late-C18 and early-C19 workers' cottages;

* Date: the cottages date to c1830/40 at the beginning of a building boom that transformed the built landscape of Bradford, and are an important survival of vernacular buildings before the construction of standardised terraces and back-to-backs in the latter part of the century;

* Survival: despite some later alteration the cottages retain numerous original features, including stone-slate roofs, substantial chimneystacks, garden walling, some stone stairs and original floorings.

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