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Church of St Nicholas

A Grade II* Listed Building in Whitchurch, Bath and North East Somerset

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Coordinates

Latitude: 51.406 / 51°24'21"N

Longitude: -2.5589 / 2°33'31"W

OS Eastings: 361223

OS Northings: 167592

OS Grid: ST612675

Mapcode National: GBR JS.QM1K

Mapcode Global: VH88V.LXLJ

Entry Name: Church of St Nicholas

Listing Date: 1 February 1956

Grade: II*

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1136442

English Heritage Legacy ID: 32636

Location: Whitchurch, Bath and North East Somerset, BS14

County: Bath and North East Somerset

Civil Parish: Whitchurch

Built-Up Area: Bristol

Traditional County: Somerset

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Somerset

Church of England Parish: St Nicholas, Whitchurch

Church of England Diocese: Bristol

Find accommodation in
Keynsham

Listing Text

ST 66 NW
2/211

WHITCHURCH,
CHURCH ROAD (south side),
Church of St. Nicholas

(Formerly listed under CHARLTON LANE)

1.2.56

G.V. II*

Parish church. Late C12, altered C13 and early C14, and C15; restored C19.
Consists of nave, north porch, south chapel incorporated in a south transept,
south aisle and porch, north transept, crossing tower and chancel. Coursed
squared rubble with freestone dressings, plain tiled roofs with coped raised
verges. Unbuttressed central tower with dressed quoins, pyramidal roof set
back behind plain parapet with gargoyles; plain 2-light pointed windows to the
bell chamber. Nave. Two 2-light C19, Geometrical style windows. Projecting,
gabled north porch with a pointed doorway in a hollow-step-ogee moulded surround
and under a hoodmould. North Transept. Angle buttresses with off-sets, 3-
light window with lower central light which has a quatrefoil above, all lights
have cusped heads. Chancel. Plain and small lancet windows on north side,
one restored; 3-light east window as north transept. South aisle. C15 3-
light Perpendicular style east window under a 4-centred head. 2- and 3-light
Perpendicular style windows with plain and cusped ogee heads, respectively, all
under square dripmoulds. Projecting, gabled south porch in hollow-ogee
moulded surround. West window of south aisle and nave are 3-light Perpendicular
style windows. North doorway is C12 but restored, continuous chamfered and
roll moulded surround; C15 arch-braced collar beam roof with embattled wall-
plate to north porch. Interior. 3 bay arcade to south aisle, piers of
alternating hollows and shafts which have circular caps, hollow-chamfered
4-centred arches. Late mediaeval wagon roofs to nave and south aisle,
embattled wallplate. The tower arches are pointed and stepped, springing from
corbels with long stems and trumpet capitals - a thick one to the main arch and
a thin one to the outer order, those on the nave arch face out into the nave
but the others face into the crossing. Chancel: deep embrasures to north and
south windows (the south one looks into the chapel); east window and north
transept window have fine colonettes attached to inside of the mullions, the
outer order is enriched with leaf moulded capitals; C15 archway to south
chapel, filled with carved wooden screen which has cusped and traceried panels,
blank to the lower part and open above, with a rosette frieze. Archway from
south aisle has continuous ogee-hollow-ogee moulded surround; Perpendicular
style wooden screen with traceried and paired lower panels, enriched frieze,
triple, open upper panels, enriched vine frieze and pierced parapet, the main
uprights also have attached pinnacles. Monuments. South Chapel: 2 inscribed
marble tablets to Holbeach family, by Lychyard of Keynsham, aedicular in
panelled pilasters with trigylph frieze. Colston family, earliest date is
1739 but to 1847, with urn finials. Nave: Isaac Emery, died 1761, inscribed
marble plaque with broken pediment. (N. Pevsner, The Buildings of England :
North Somerset and Bristol, 1958).


Listing NGR: ST6122367592

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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