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Church of St Saviour

A Grade II Listed Building in Macclesfield Forest and Wildboarclough, Cheshire East

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Coordinates

Latitude: 53.2162 / 53°12'58"N

Longitude: -2.0246 / 2°1'28"W

OS Eastings: 398454

OS Northings: 368788

OS Grid: SJ984687

Mapcode National: GBR 23B.BYJ

Mapcode Global: WHBBX.WF28

Entry Name: Church of St Saviour

Listing Date: 7 November 1983

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1145911

English Heritage Legacy ID: 58104

Location: Macclesfield Forest and Wildboarclough, Cheshire East, SK11

County: Cheshire East

Civil Parish: Macclesfield Forest and Wildboarclough

Traditional County: Cheshire

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Cheshire

Church of England Parish: Wildboarclough St Saviour

Church of England Diocese: Chester

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Listing Text

WILDBOARCLOUGH C.P.
SJ 96 NE
3/10 Church of St. Saviour.
GV II
Church 1901-9 for 16th Earl of Derby. Coursed red sandstone rubble
with ashlar quoins, windows and doorways and Kerridge stone-slate
roofs. Squat 2-stage battlemented west tower, aisleless nave of 4
bays, chancel of 1 bay, gabled south porch, north vestry. Pointed
east window of 3 lancets under hoodmould on carved heads as corbels;
square-headed mullioned windows to nave, south side of chancel and to
vestry, with square labels and hollow-moulded mullions and surrounds;
hollow-moulded surrounds to doors. Two gabled 3-light dormers of oak
on south slope of nave roof. Foundation stone in south wall of
chancel: This stone was laid by Constance, Countess of Derby, Sept
14th 1901.
The simple interior is plastered above oak dado. Oak queenpost
trusses to nave; through purlins to chancel; rafters and
diagonal-boarded underdrawing, all of oak. Simple oak pews.
Bowl-shaped stone font on base with corner-shafts and stiff-leaf
capitals. The church was built, to commemorate the safe return of the
Earl of Derby's sons from the Boer War, using Estate masons and
carpenters.


Listing NGR: SJ9845468788


This List entry has been amended to add sources for War Memorials Online and the War Memorials Register. These sources were not used in the compilation of this List entry but are added here as a guide for further reading, 27 February 2018.

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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