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Stubley Old Hall

A Grade II* Listed Building in Wardle and West Littleborough, Rochdale

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Coordinates

Latitude: 53.641 / 53°38'27"N

Longitude: -2.1106 / 2°6'38"W

OS Eastings: 392783

OS Northings: 416057

OS Grid: SD927160

Mapcode National: GBR FVPB.VJ

Mapcode Global: WHB8R.KR53

Entry Name: Stubley Old Hall

Listing Date: 2 January 1967

Grade: II*

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1162360

English Heritage Legacy ID: 213396

Location: Rochdale, OL15

County: Rochdale

Electoral Ward/Division: Wardle and West Littleborough

Built-Up Area: Littleborough

Traditional County: Lancashire

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Greater Manchester

Church of England Parish: Dearnley St Andrew

Church of England Diocese: Manchester

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Littleborough

Listing Text

SD 91 NW,
1/60

LITTLEBOROUGH,
STUBLEY BROW,
Stubley Old Hall

02/01/67

II*

House. Cruck-framed south cross wing perhaps of C15 with
timber-framed open hall and north cross wing added c.1530.
The front elevation was faced in hammer-dressed stone in
c.1600 and the rear and sides faced in brick in the later
C17, C18 and C19. The hall is open to the roof whereas the
cross wings each have two storeys. Graduated stone slate roof.
Quoins and projecting plinth. 6-light mullion and double-
transom hall window with hoodmould. Door adjacent to right
cross wing has chamfered surround and obtuse-angled lintel.
Between the two are a 3- and 4-light window (one on each
floor) which may be later insertions. 4-light mullion and
transom window (Cl9) to right cross wing which is gabled and
a 3-light window on first floor. The left cross wing is also
gabled and has 3- and 6-light windows, one with a transom.
Central ridge chimney stack. Two powerful chimney stacks
with brattishing (c.1600) dominate the north elevation. The
rear of the north wing is in brick on a stone lower storey
and includes a window with brick hoodmould. The rear of the
hall reveals a principal post within the brickwork.
Interior: Only one of the three original cruck trusses survives
In the south wing, it has a tie beam and wind bracing to the
purlins. Arch-braced and king-post roof trusses support the
hall roof which has curved wind bracing. The north wing
retains part of the wall framing, chamfered stone fireplaces
one with an uncarved shield on its lintel, a braced cambered
tie-beam roof truss and a ceiling with moulded timber
members. The house has had a particularly varied and
interesting development during its long history exhibiting
different types of construction and technology as well as
planning.

Victoria County History of Lancashire, Vol. 5,
1911. H. Fishwick, History of Rochdale, 1889.


Listing NGR: SD9278316057

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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