History in Structure

This site is entirely user-supported. See how you can help.

The Mansion

A Grade I Listed Building in Allerton Mauleverer with Hopperton, North Yorkshire

Approximate Location Map
Large Map »
Street View
Contributor Photos »

Street View is the best available vantage point looking, if possible, towards the location of the building. In some locations, Street View may not give a view of the actual building, or may not be available at all. Where it is not available, the satellite view is shown instead.

Coordinates

Latitude: 54.0172 / 54°1'1"N

Longitude: -1.3694 / 1°22'9"W

OS Eastings: 441416

OS Northings: 458089

OS Grid: SE414580

Mapcode National: GBR LPWZ.BQ

Mapcode Global: WHD9M.Y926

Entry Name: The Mansion

Listing Date: 15 March 1966

Last Amended: 30 September 1985

Grade: I

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1189430

English Heritage Legacy ID: 330581

Location: Allerton Mauleverer with Hopperton, Harrogate, North Yorkshire, HG5

County: North Yorkshire

District: Harrogate

Civil Parish: Allerton Mauleverer with Hoppe

Traditional County: Yorkshire

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): North Yorkshire

Find accommodation in
Ferrensby

Listing Text

In the entry for the following:-

SE 45 NW ALLERTON MAULEVERER WITH HOPPERTON

3/2 ALLERTON PARK

15.3.66 The Mansion (Previously listed
as Allerton Park)

GV II*


The Grade shall be amended to read Grade I.

------------------------------------

In the entry for the following:-

SE 45 NW ALLERTON MAULEVERER WITH HOPPERTON

3/2 ALLERTON PARK

15.3.66 The Mansion (previously listed
as Allerton Park)
GV
I
The address shall be amended to read as follows:-

SE 45 NW ALLERTON MAULEVERER WITH HOPPERTON

3/2 ALLERTON PARK

15.3.66 Allerton Park

GV
I

------------------------------------


SE 45 NW ALLERTON MAULEVERER ALLERTON PARK
WITH HOPPERTON
3/2 The Mansion (Previously listed
15.3.66 as Allerton Park)

GV II*


Large mansion. 1848-51, possibly incorporating earlier house of 1721. By
George Martin of Baker Street, London, for the 18th Lord Stourton. In a
Neo-Jacobean style. Coursed gritstone with grey slates and lead roof.
Tall, 2-storey main block with central open hall, rising through the centre
and lit by a third, lantern storey. Lower 3-storey range to east and north,
with courtyard on north-east side. Plinth, moulded first-floor and eaves
band, crenellated parapet, shaped gables and dormers with pinnacles and tall
stacks. South entrance front has 3-bay projecting centre with projecting
port-cochère with 3½-storey tower above. Either side single gabled bays
with ground-floor square bay windows, and octagonal corner turrets. West
front has 3-bay projecting central section with central 2-storey bow window.
North front has projecting 3-gabled central section, with slightly
projecting central bay with octagonal turrets. 3 glazed circular openings
on ground floor, with 3 windows above. Either side single square bay
windows on ground floor. Central clerestory tower projects above skyline
with curved battlements and pinnacles. Interior has vast 3-storey central
hall lit by clerestory tower, with Perpendicular windows containing stained
glass and a fine hammer-beam wooden roof. Single 2-storey halls to east and
west of central hall, both lit by glazed roofs. The eastern hall has large
staircase protruding through arch into central hall. All 3 halls have
Perpendicular panelling up to canted gallery at first-floor level. The
first-floor arches all have crocketed ogee surrounds. Tall entrance
passages to north and south with Perpendicular panelling and hammer-beam
roofs. Dining room in north-east corner has very fine panelling by Benjamin
Baud, pendant stucco ceiling and fine fireplace. Good brass torcheres in
halls now converted to electricity. Other ground-floor rooms include saloon
(west side), library, and billiard room with original light fitting over the
table. The previous house on this site was a rebuild by the Duke of York of
a house built in 1721 by Hon. Richard Arundel (surveyor of the Kings Works)
for himself. The Duke of York bought the estate from Viscount Galway in
1786. It was occupied by the Duke of York and the Prince of Wales until
1789 when the house and estate were sold to Colonel Thornton, who altered
the name to Thornville Royal. An illustration of this former house shows
the 'chapel room and chapel' which remain at the west end of the present
chapel (q.v.). In 1805 the property was bought by Charles Philip, 16th Lord
Stourton. In 1851-2 Charles, 18th Lord Stourton caused the house to be
rebuilt. Nearly all the materials (brick) of the former buildings were said
to have been used in the new house, but a wing of solid construction
remained on the north side while the new house was under construction. It
is possible that this was converted and encased as a service wing when the
new house was added to the west. A mound of rubble to the north west of the
present building is also thought to be the debris from demolition of the C18
house. H. Speight, Nidderdale, 1894, pp 197-200. Report of the Victorian
Society.


Listing NGR: SE4141658089

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

Selected Sources

Source links go to a search for the specified title at Amazon. Availability of the title is dependent on current publication status. You may also want to check AbeBooks, particularly for older titles.

Other nearby listed buildings

BritishListedBuildings.co.uk is an independent online resource and is not associated with any government department. All government data published here is used under licence. Please do not contact BritishListedBuildings.co.uk for any queries related to any individual listed building, planning permission related to listed buildings or the listing process itself.

British Listed Buildings is a Good Stuff website.