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The Almhouses

A Grade II Listed Building in Cowesby, North Yorkshire

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Coordinates

Latitude: 54.3021 / 54°18'7"N

Longitude: -1.2852 / 1°17'6"W

OS Eastings: 446613

OS Northings: 489843

OS Grid: SE466898

Mapcode National: GBR MLGP.KL

Mapcode Global: WHD8B.7488

Entry Name: The Almhouses

Listing Date: 1 May 1952

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1190826

English Heritage Legacy ID: 332544

Location: Cowesby, Hambleton, North Yorkshire, YO7

County: North Yorkshire

District: Hambleton

Civil Parish: Cowesby

Traditional County: Yorkshire

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): North Yorkshire

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Listing Text

COWESBY MAIN STREET
SE 4689
(EAST SIDE, OFF)
9/17 THE ALMSHOUSES
1.5.52
GV II
Row of 4 almshouses, now one dwelling. Late C17 for Nathaniel, Lord Crewe,
Bishop of Durham; coverted c1980. Tooled coursed squared stone, pantile roof.
Single-storey with attic, 4 cells. Plinth. Two sets of paired chamfered
quoined doorways with triangular soffits to lintels flanked by 2-tight recessed
chamfered mullion windows. Ashlar coping on shaped kneelers with ball finials.
Rebuilt end and central ridge stacks. Rear: a single-tight recessed chamfered
window to each cell, the 2nd from right enlarged to a 2-light window; inserted
central door and skylights. Each return has two recessed chamfered tights to
gables. Interior: chamfered and stop-chamfered spine beams. End fireplaces
with adjacent stone spiral staircases survive, that at right end plastered over,
that at left end with chamfered surround and massive 2-piece lintel. Attic:
large-scantling purlins. The attics of the central almshouses were formerly lit
by dormers and the stacks were corniced (pre-conversion photo held by owner).
The roof originally had coupled common rafters with occasional collars (WYCVBSG
Report). The building has been dated dendrochronologically to 1680+ 9 years
(ibid). -
W. Grainge, The Vale of Mowbray: a historical and topographical account of
Thirsk and its Neighbourhood (1859). North Yorkshire and Cleveland Vernacular
Buildings Study Group, Report No. 685.


Listing NGR: SE4661389843

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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