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Red Mount Chapel

A Grade I Listed Building in King's Lynn, Norfolk

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Coordinates

Latitude: 52.7518 / 52°45'6"N

Longitude: 0.4059 / 0°24'21"E

OS Eastings: 562470

OS Northings: 319842

OS Grid: TF624198

Mapcode National: GBR N3R.FFM

Mapcode Global: WHJP7.63J7

Entry Name: Red Mount Chapel

Listing Date: 1 December 1951

Grade: I

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1195403

English Heritage Legacy ID: 384331

Location: King's Lynn and West Norfolk, Norfolk, PE30

County: Norfolk

District: King's Lynn and West Norfolk

Town: King's Lynn and West Norfolk

Electoral Ward/Division: St Margarets with St Nicholas

Built-Up Area: King's Lynn

Traditional County: Norfolk

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Norfolk

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Listing Text


KING'S LYNN

TF6219NW THE WALKS
610-1/10/254 Red Mount Chapel
01/12/51

I

Formerly known as: Chapel of Our Lady of the Mount THE WALKS.
Wayside Chapel on Walsingham pilgrimage route. 1483-85 by
Robert Curraunt, the chapel 1505-06, attributed to Simon Clerk
and John Wastell.
Brick with ashlar dressings and ashlar core. Octagonal,
constructed in the form of 2 concentric drums, the outer of
brick. Roof not visible. Basement and 2 storeys to outer drum,
a third to inner drum. Random bond brick. 2 set-offs. Corners
supported by stepped buttresses with ashlar dressings with an
arched opening punched through each. Main entrance to west via
timber studded door set under a depressed arch. One trefoil
niche right and left.
At intervals round the chapel are quatrefoil lights and
2-light mullioned windows, but the top floor of the outer drum
is lit through a 4-light stone mullioned window with depressed
heads beneath a straight hood mould, one such to each facet.
Subsidiary door to north-east facet at ground floor, with, in
the next facet clockwise, a 4-light stone mullioned window
with hollow, roll and fillet mouldings. Inner drum emerges
over roof-line as a stone cruciform illuminated through one
encircled quatrefoil oculus to each of the 4 main facets.
INTERIOR. Arrangement is of a barrel-vaulted cellar below the
twin drums, which are both octagonal below the ashlar chapel.
Between the skins are 2 brick staircases with a roll-moulded
handrail cut into inner wall. One starts at each external
doorway and run counter-wise to each other, arriving at the
antechamber to the chapel from opposing directions. Facing
main door is a 6-light stone mullioned window with hollow and
ovolo mouldings looking down into basement. 2 diamond pane
leaded casements remain.
Central core is largely brick with ashlar dressings but gives
way to ashlar with brick dressings in upper storeys, emerging
as all ashlar at chapel. Ample evidence of breaks in the work
at top floor of outer drum, and of a change in design. At
intervals are good examples of C17 and early C18 grafitti. As
staircases emerge at the chapel an ambulatory is formed, C20
timber steps leading into the cruciform sanctuary itself,
which is attributed to Clerk and Wastell.
Elaborate fan-vaulted roof with recurring motifs of encircled
quatrefoils, the 4 limbs having panel tracery. Scheduled
Ancient Monument.


Listing NGR: TF6247019842

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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