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Little Lampetts

A Grade II Listed Building in Blackmore, Hook End and Wyatts Green, Essex

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Coordinates

Latitude: 51.675 / 51°40'29"N

Longitude: 0.321 / 0°19'15"E

OS Eastings: 560578

OS Northings: 199908

OS Grid: TQ605999

Mapcode National: GBR YD.1L1

Mapcode Global: VHHMX.J519

Entry Name: Little Lampetts

Listing Date: 4 June 1992

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1197170

English Heritage Legacy ID: 373330

Location: Blackmore, Hook End and Wyatts Green, Brentwood, Essex, CM4

County: Essex

District: Brentwood

Civil Parish: Blackmore, Hook End and Wyatts

Traditional County: Essex

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Essex

Church of England Parish: Blackmore St Laurence

Church of England Diocese: Chelmsford

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Listing Text


BLACKMORE

TQ69NW HAY GREEN LANE
723-1/6/26 (South East side)
04/06/92 Little Lampetts

II

Formerly known as: Hay Green Farm Cottages HAY GREEN LANE.
House. C17, extended in C18 and C19. Timber-framed,
weatherboarded, roofed with handmade red clay tiles. 3 bays
facing N with central stack, extended by one bay at each end
in C18. 2 storeys. Original lean-to stair annexe to rear, and
C19 lean-to to rear of it, of red brick roofed with red clay
pantiles. C20 conservatory to left of stair annexe. C19
single-storey lean-to at each end, the left roofed with red
clay pantiles, the right with handmade red clay tiles.
4-window range of C20 casements. C20 door. Roof half-hipped at
each end.
INTERIOR: the timber frame includes much elm and some reused
oak. Unjowled posts, primary straight bracing. Chamfered axial
beam in each bay; plain joists of vertical section in all but
the bay to left of the stack. This bay has a reused axial beam
with empty mortices for studs, and reused joists of horizontal
section, chamfered with lamb's tongue stops, and some plain
joists of square section. The axial beam in the left bay is
also reused, with step stops. Most of the studded partition
between the 2 ground-floor rooms to right of the stack has
been removed; 2 sharply curved timbers have been introduced
since 1960. The right hearth has been re-bricked; it contains
an introduced cast-iron fireback dated 1622; the left hearth
is blocked. Original boarded and ledged pine door at foot of
stair. Boarded and ledged oak door between 2 ground-floor
rooms to left of stack. In the rear wall on the first floor
are 2 large original apertures for glazed windows, blocked.
The upper right room has original wallplates and end tie-beam
approximately one metre above floor level, and others aligning
with the remainder of the house. The scarf joints in the
wallplates of the original house are of unusual face-halved
type. Queen-post roof incorporating some smoke-blackened
rafters from a medieval hall.
This was built as one house, extended to form 2 similar
cottages with shared stack, now one house. Photographs in the
possession of the owner show that the present windows were
installed before 1960. Shown in estate map of 1832. The
lean-to at the left end was being altered at the time of
inspection, February 1989.
(Essex Record Offices: D/DQ 50/6).


Listing NGR: TL6055100023

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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