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The White Hart Public House and Attached Garage (Part of Number 33)

A Grade II Listed Building in Eynsham, Oxfordshire

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Coordinates

Latitude: 51.7829 / 51°46'58"N

Longitude: -1.3719 / 1°22'18"W

OS Eastings: 443427

OS Northings: 209549

OS Grid: SP434095

Mapcode National: GBR 7X8.1ZL

Mapcode Global: VHCXL.5GL1

Entry Name: The White Hart Public House and Attached Garage (Part of Number 33)

Listing Date: 17 October 1988

Last Amended: 13 November 1989

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1198520

English Heritage Legacy ID: 252231

Location: Eynsham, West Oxfordshire, Oxfordshire, OX29

County: Oxfordshire

District: West Oxfordshire

Civil Parish: Eynsham

Built-Up Area: Eynsham

Traditional County: Oxfordshire

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Oxfordshire

Church of England Parish: Eynsham

Church of England Diocese: Oxford

Find accommodation in
Cassington

Listing Text

EYNSHAM NEWLAND STREET
SP 4309
(north side)
14/153 The White Hart Public
House and attached garage

GV II

The entry shall be amended to read:

SP 4309 EYNSHAM NEWLAND STREET
(north side)
14/153 No 31 (The White Hart
Public House) and
attached garage (part of
No 33)

GV II

Hall house, now public house and garage. C14; remodelled in early C17, with mid
C18 and C20 alterations. Cruck-framed. Coursed limestone rubble, roughcast
front of garage on right; gabled stone slate roof, with corrugated iron to rear
right; rear lateral stack and left end stack of stone finished in brick; C19
brick front lateral stack. Medieval open hall with solar to left and service to
right: remodelled as 4-unit plan in C17. One storey and attic; 4-window
range. C19 bracketed hood over 6-panelled door. Concrete lintels over C20
casements: concrete lintel over medieval service doorway to right, which has a
plain chamfer with broach stop to one stone ashlar door jamb and late C20 board
door. Timber lintel over C20 garage doors in bay to right. Early C20 gabled
half-dormers. Mid C18 wing to rear of one storey and attic; 2-window range of
limestone rubble with gabled stone slate roof. Interior: originally a 4-bay
hall-house with a raised-cruck roof, the 2 central trusses being heavily smoke-
blackened. The central truss has an arch-braced collar with windbraces: the
other trusses were identical, but only the right-hand truss retains a collar and
arch braces. Some windbraces survive; through-purlins replaced and turned
around in C17; reset smoke-blackened rafters in central bays; morticed beam of
original screens partition survives to right of service doorway, which has
arched chamfered lintel above. Floor and stacks inserted in early C17, probably
at solar end (to left) first. Chamfered beam with rolled and run-out stop to
left; chamfered beam, and chamfered bressummer over open fireplace with ingle-
nook seats to centre. Winder stairs to rear, and C17 trap door to attic.
History: probably the "aula" mentioned in the Eynsham Abbey cartulary of 1366.
Divided into 2 dwellings in 1750's and was licensed as the "Haunch of Venison"
from 1785. The manorial courts met here in the C19. The garage bay and doorway
to its left are now part of No 33. (Information from the VCH).

------------------------------------

EYNSHAM NEWLAND STREET
SP4309 (North side)
14/153 The White Hart Public House
and attached garage

GV II

Hall house, now public house and garage. C14; remodelled in early C17, with mid
C18 and C20 alterations. Cruck-framed. Coursed limestone rubble, roughcast front
of garage on right; gabled stone slate roof, with corrugated iron to rear right;
rear lateral stack and left end stack of stone finished in brick; C19 brick
front lateral stack. Medieval open hall with solar to left and service to right:
remodelled as 4-unit plan in C17. One storey and attic; 4-window range. C19
bracketed hood over 6-panelled door. Concrete lintels over C20 casements:
concrete lintel over blocked medieval service doorway to right, which has a
plain chamfer with broach stop to one stone ashlar door jamb. Timber lintel over
C20 garage doors in bay to right: early C20 gabled half-dormers. Mid C18 wing to
rear of one storey and-attic; 2-window range of limestone rubble with gabled
stone slate roof. Interior: originally a 4-bay hall-house with a raised-cruck
roof, the 2 central trusses being heavily smoke-blackened. The central truss has
an arch-braced collar with windbraces: the other trusses were identical, but
only the right-hand truss retains a collar and arch braces. Some windbraces
survive; through-purlins replaced and turned around in C17; reset
smoke-blackened rafters in central bays; morticed beam of original screens
partition survives to right of service doorway, which has arched chamfered
lintel above. Floor and stacks inserted in early C17, probably at solar end (to
left) first. Chamfered beam with rolled and run-out stop to left; chamfered
beam, and chamfered bressumer over open fireplace with inglenook seats to
centre. Winder stairs to rear, and C17 trap door to attic. History: probably the
"aula" mentioned in the Eynsham Abbey cartulary of 1366. Divided into 2
dwellings in 1750's and was licensed as the "Haunch of Venison" from 1785. The
manorial courts met here in the C19.
(Information from the V.C.H.).


Listing NGR: SP4342709549

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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