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Kings Arms Public House

A Grade II Listed Building in Deddington, Oxfordshire

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Coordinates

Latitude: 51.9823 / 51°58'56"N

Longitude: -1.3219 / 1°19'18"W

OS Eastings: 446668

OS Northings: 231754

OS Grid: SP466317

Mapcode National: GBR 7TT.NM7

Mapcode Global: VHCWN.1FJQ

Entry Name: Kings Arms Public House

Listing Date: 8 December 1955

Last Amended: 5 May 1988

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1200414

English Heritage Legacy ID: 243905

Location: Deddington, Cherwell, Oxfordshire, OX15

County: Oxfordshire

District: Cherwell

Civil Parish: Deddington

Built-Up Area: Deddington

Traditional County: Oxfordshire

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Oxfordshire

Church of England Parish: Deddington

Church of England Diocese: Oxford

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Deddington

Listing Text

SP4631 DEDDINGTON HORSEFAIR
(North side)
8/180 King's Arms Public House
08/12/55 (Formerly listed as King's
Arms Hotel)

GV II
Inn, now public house. Probably early/mid C16, re-modelled mid C17 and altered
late C18/early C19. Rendered stone; Stonesfield-slate and Welsh-slate roofs with
rubble-and-brick stacks. 2-unit through-passage plan plus long cross-wing. 2
storeys plus attic. Centre of 4-window front has a gabled rectangular 2-storey
bay window, with 6-light stone-mullioned windows below flat label moulds in both
floors; gable wall of cross wing, to left, has a similar bay window at ground
floor only, now without its mullions, and has a 16-pane sash above. Bay window-
may be C17 additions. Remaining bays of front include a third bay window,
probably early C18, with a 6-light casement above which are two 16-pane sashes.
Bay windows are linked by a C20 flat canopy, sheltering fielded 6-panel doors,
set between the projections. Steep-pitched roof has a brick gable stack to right
and returns on left to the 2-window cross wing, which has a large projecting
lateral stack in line with main range. Wing has C18 and C19 casements, and has a
C19 stone rear gable wall. Rear of main range has C20 extensions, partly masking
a massive rendered lateral stack with numerous offsets, and has a gabled stair
projection which is probably a C17 addition. Interior: main range has the
moulded heads of through-passage partitions, to left with wide mortices for a
plank screen. Room to right (probably originally unheated) has stop-chamfered
spine and lateral beams. Room to left, with a large rubble-arched open
fireplace, has heavy stop-chamfered intersecting beam and lateral beams; small
Tudor-arched wooden doorway leads to cross-wing. (Rooms now combined into bar).
Stair projection to rear of right room has a mid/late-C17 open-well stair with
large turned balusters and a square handrail, the lowest balustade extended
upwards with 2 more tiers of contemporary balusters. First floor has remains of
a chamber fireplace, the bressumer chamfer originally returning down the jambs,
3-bay roof, originally separate from cross-wing roof, retains the timber-framed
left gable (now internal) with closely-spaced studs, and has a similar truss
over the through passage; between them is an arch-braced collar truss with a
later tiebean. Roof was probably reconstructed with new purlins and an attic
floor in C17 after structural failure but retains massive rafters and 2 curved
windbraces. Cross-wing contains a long room with smaller stop-chamfered
intersecting beans and perimeter beams dividing the ceiling into 8 panels; rear
room has a heavy chamfered beam with closely-spaced unchamfered joists; a
timber-framed cross passage (with later stair) divides the range at both floors.
Roof is much altered and reinforced but retains at least one arch-braced collar
truss. Neither roof shows smoke blackening, but principal first-floor room in
each range was probably originally open to rafters. A rare example of the use of
partial timber-framing in a stone-building region.
(Buildings of England: Oxfordshire: p571; VCH: Oxfordshire: Vol XI, p86)


Listing NGR: SP4666831754

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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