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50 Wake Green Road

A Grade II Listed Building in Moseley and Kings Heath, Birmingham

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Coordinates

Latitude: 52.4431 / 52°26'35"N

Longitude: -1.8763 / 1°52'34"W

OS Eastings: 408505

OS Northings: 282800

OS Grid: SP085828

Mapcode National: GBR 65Q.M3

Mapcode Global: VH9Z3.FVFH

Entry Name: 50 Wake Green Road

Listing Date: 8 July 1982

Last Amended: 21 January 2015

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1211119

English Heritage Legacy ID: 217729

Location: Birmingham, B13

County: Birmingham

Electoral Ward/Division: Moseley and Kings Heath

Parish: Non Civil Parish

Built-Up Area: Birmingham

Traditional County: Worcestershire

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): West Midlands

Church of England Parish: Moseley St Agnes

Church of England Diocese: Birmingham

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Summary

A suburban house, dated 1907, designed by George Edward Pepper in an Arts and Crafts style.

Description

MATERIALS: stretcher bond red brick with stone dressings and a plain tiled roof

PLAN: two storeys with attached, single-storey garage block.

EXTERIOR: the entrance front has two bays. At left is a projecting, gabled bay with canted corners. This has a canted bay window to the ground floor of four lights above which is an oriel of three canted lights which is flanked by diamond patterns of stones set flush into the brickwork. There is a lancet to the gable, which has stone copings and kneelers. At right of this the entrance porch is flanked by two timber, Ionic columns which support a segmental porch that has prominent dentals. To the right of this is a small veranda and a canted bay window of four lights. The roof descends to the ground floor over this portion of the front and there is a gabled dormer window of three lights to the first floor with a dressed brick surround. Attached to the right is a pedestrian door with arched head and to the right again is the prominent garage which has a round arched entrance with double doors. To the ridge of the garage roof is a polygonal louvered ventilation turret with a domed lead roof and sceptre finial. The rear has a gabled bay with canted corners at left which has two first floor sash windows. At right of this there is a wide canted bay with French windows to the ground floor and above this a first-floor canted bay with flat head of seven lights.

INTERIOR: the drawing room has stained glass wreaths to the leaded windows of the canted bay. An inglenook fireplace has similar, smaller windows and a panelled oak surround with inlayed blond wood motifs of swags and ribbons. Another ground floor room also has an inglenook fireplace with panelling to the walls and a panelled plaster and wood ceiling. There is a fitted dresser to the kitchen with glazed doors to its upper body.

History

A suburban house, dated 1907, designed by George Edward Pepper in an Arts and Crafts style.

Reasons for Listing

No. 50, Wake Green Road, Birmingham, is listed at Grade II for the following, principal reasons:
* Architectural quality: the house is a good example of the work of the noted architect George E Pepper built according to the arts and crafts aesthetic;
* Intact survival: the house retains the chief elements of its external and internal appearance, including internal fittings, and a motor house.

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