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Brownshill House

A Grade II Listed Building in Painswick, Gloucestershire

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Coordinates

Latitude: 51.7655 / 51°45'55"N

Longitude: -2.206 / 2°12'21"W

OS Eastings: 385881

OS Northings: 207441

OS Grid: SO858074

Mapcode National: GBR 1MD.73Q

Mapcode Global: VH94R.QW4G

Entry Name: Brownshill House

Listing Date: 21 October 1955

Last Amended: 24 August 1990

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1267094

English Heritage Legacy ID: 133553

Location: Painswick, Stroud, Gloucestershire, GL6

County: Gloucestershire

District: Stroud

Civil Parish: Painswick

Traditional County: Gloucestershire

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Gloucestershire

Church of England Parish: Pitchcombe St John the Baptist

Church of England Diocese: Gloucester

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Listing Text

PAINSWICK WICK STREET
SO 80 NE
(west side)
5/356 Brownshill House
(formerly listed as Wick
21.10.55 Street Farmhouse)
GV II
Large detached house. Dated over entrance EP (Edward Palling) 1665, but looks
of earlier date, as does the moulded door surround. Limestone ashlar, stone
slate roofs. A long narrow building which looks as if it was once a hall house,
with service wing left, and hall with parlour right, but the facade now complete
two or 2½ storey C17 layout. There is a full height coped gable far left and to
the left of doorway; a second full height, uncoped gable near right end.
1:2:1:1 windows plus stair lights, stone mullioned casements with leading and to
stopped hoods; in left gable 2, over 3, over 4-light with king mullion, then,
well to right of door, 3 over 3-light, and 2 over 2-light, the last without
hood, smaller and lower set; two stair lights; in right gable 2 over 3-light,
over two 2-light perhaps replacing former 4-light. Extreme right 2 over
2-light. Left gable has plaque set high, and right gable a small oculus. The
plank and batten main door is in a moulded surround with moulded imposts and a
flat basket-handle arch in a deep lintel stone carrying a key-stone decorated
with date and initials, all beneath a capping mould. Above is a vesica piscis
in rusticated surround with eovil-de-beuf windows in upper two thirds, glazed
with intersecting Gothick leading. Main gables are coped, left one has stack,
and there are two further ridge stacks. The back elevation is similar, but the
centre section is in coursed rubble; there are two 4-light plus transom wood
windows and a central 3-light dormer. Small square light left of door. C20
glazed door far left to large stone lintel. Right gable has 2 over 3 over
3-light and right gable 2, over 3, over 2-door 2-light; small oculus high in
gable. Interior: panel and muntin screen to left of door on entry. Centre room
has deep chamfered stopped beam, large deep fire with C20 bressummer; some
opened-up timber framework to a partition. Drawing room has a 2-panel C17
plaster ceiling, large square fire opening to ovolo mould surround and
shouldered mantel shelf; spiral stair beside fire. Roof structure not seen. An
unusual elongated horse plan. William Palling, who built, or rebuilt it in
1665, had four sons. He owned also Well Farmhouse (q.v.).


Listing NGR: SO8588107441

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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