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The Manor House School

A Grade II Listed Building in Mole Valley, Surrey

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Coordinates

Latitude: 51.2738 / 51°16'25"N

Longitude: -0.3914 / 0°23'28"W

OS Eastings: 512307

OS Northings: 153968

OS Grid: TQ123539

Mapcode National: GBR HG1.3VR

Mapcode Global: VHFVK.57GV

Entry Name: The Manor House School

Listing Date: 7 September 1951

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1293402

English Heritage Legacy ID: 290594

Location: Mole Valley, Surrey, KT23

County: Surrey

District: Mole Valley

Town: Mole Valley

Electoral Ward/Division: Bookham South

Built-Up Area: Leatherhead

Traditional County: Surrey

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Surrey

Church of England Parish: Little Bookham

Church of England Diocese: Guildford

Find accommodation in
Bookham

Listing Text

LITTLE BOOKHAM MANOR HOUSE LANE
TQ/15/SW (west side)
5/197

7.9.51 The Manor House School

GV II

Manor house, now school C18, altered and enlarged in early C19 (plus recent
additions which are not of special interest). Orange hand-made brick in Flemish
bond, the south front stuccoed and painted white, red tile roof. L-shaped plan
formed by rectangular double-depth house and associated service wing to the
rear, with a wing at the south-east corner which appears to be an addition.
Three-storey main block, 2-storey rear wing; the principal facade to the south is
a symmetrical composition of 3 storeys with prominent semicircular 3-bay bows
flanking a 2-bay centre, a 1st-floor balcony, and a parapet; the centre has a
very wide elliptical-headed doorway with glazed double doors and side windows
under a fanlight with radiating glazing bars, under a loggia with 2 pairs of fluted
Doric columns in antis, a triglyph frieze and thin cornice; 12-pane sashes at 1st
floor and 9-pane sashes above. The loggia has a balcony which is continued round
both bows as a very thin platform on brackets and protected by a delicate
balustrade of latticed wrought-iron. The bows have tall 15-pane sashed windows
at ground and 1st floors (rising from the ground and the balcony respectively),
and 9-pane sashes at 2nd floor. The level of the upper floor inside the left bow
does not match the windows, the upper panes of the 1st-floor windows being
blind-glazed, and the hipped roof covers only this bow and the centre, suggesting
that the right-hand bow was an addition to the original building and that the
left was added in symmetry with it. Part of the 4-bay left return wall is
covered by a recent 2-storey wing (which is not of special interest), but the
rest has 12- and 9-pane sashed windows with gauged brick heads, and a brick
dentilled cornice. The right-hand return wall (the entrance front) has a large
inserted doorway, a round-headed window above, a 12-pane sash to the left of
this, and a similar cornice. The rear wing, of 2 storeys and 5 bays, has mostly
12-pane sashed windows with gauged brick heads, some at the rear blocked or
blind. Attached to the north-east corner of this wing is an L-shaped single-
storey service wing enclosing a courtyard: Interior: the principal feature of
interest is an imperial staircase with stick balusters.


Listing NGR: TQ1230753968

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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