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Monk Soham Hall

A Grade II Listed Building in Monk Soham, Suffolk

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Coordinates

Latitude: 52.2409 / 52°14'27"N

Longitude: 1.2427 / 1°14'33"E

OS Eastings: 621488

OS Northings: 265255

OS Grid: TM214652

Mapcode National: GBR VM0.H0J

Mapcode Global: VHL9W.HY90

Entry Name: Monk Soham Hall

Listing Date: 29 July 1955

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1300912

English Heritage Legacy ID: 281581

Location: Monk Soham, Mid Suffolk, Suffolk, IP13

County: Suffolk

District: Mid Suffolk

Civil Parish: Monk Soham

Traditional County: Suffolk

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Suffolk

Church of England Parish: Monk Soham St Peter

Church of England Diocese: St.Edmundsbury and Ipswich

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Listing Text

MONK SOHAM SCHOOL ROAD
TM 26 NW
2/157 Monk Soham Hall
29.7.55
- II

Manor farmhouse. Mainly C16 and C17, in several phases. C19 alterations. A
2-cell main range with cross-wing to left, extending to rear. The cross-wing
was service accommodation, the front section probably down-graded to this
function at a later date. Timber framed. The main range is cased in late C18
or early C19 red brick to front and right gable end. Remainder plastered,
with some colourwashed brick casing to side wall of cross-wing. Remains of
simple pargetting to gable end of wing. Plaintiled roof: clay tiles to front
slope of main range and adjoining forward section of wing, concrete tiles to
remainder. 2 storeys with attic in main range. Cross-wing has end jetty, 3
of the 4 supporting brackets original. Main range has 3 windows, late C19
casements: 3-light windows each side of porch and single-light windows to
extreme left. The upper right window is a mid C20 replacement of standard
type. All have cambered arches with hoodmoulds above. Lobby entrance has C19
2-storey gabled brick porch with pierced bargeboards. Doorcase has moulded
jambs, entablature and panelled reveals; semi-glazed door. A hoodmoulded 2-
light window above. Mid C20 single-paned standard windows to gable end of
wing. Internal stack with rendered cross-axial shaft. A further internal
stack in cross-wing. Interior. Oldest section is front 3 bays of cross-wing:
some plain first floor studding and irregular heavy ceiling joists in
forwardmost room on ground floor. One solid tie beam brace to a former open
truss: this tie beam has evidence for a crown-post but the roof is a C17
replacement with diminished butt purlins. To the rear are 2 mid C17 bays and
a further bay of c.1700, all raised in height in C19 to accord with the front
section. Ground floor ceilings in main range have chamfered cross-beams with
C17 plasterwork. Room to left, now sub-divided, has Fleur-de-lys, foliage and
flower motifs symmetrically arranged in each quarter. Right hand ceiling is
plain, each division with a moulded border. One first floor room has a
chamfered-joist ceiling; most of structure otherwise concealed. Roof has 2
rows of butt purlins with arched wind-bracing, probably ante-dating the roof
over the C16 section. In the entrance addition, a straight stair with stick
balusters, ramped and wreathed handrail and carved tread-ends.


Listing NGR: TM2148865255

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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