History in Structure

This site is entirely user-supported. See how you can help.

The Priory

A Grade II* Listed Building in Wherwell, Hampshire

Approximate Location Map
Large Map »
Street View
Contributor Photos »

Street View is the best available vantage point looking, if possible, towards the location of the building. In some locations, Street View may not give a view of the actual building, or may not be available at all. Where it is not available, the satellite view is shown instead.

Coordinates

Latitude: 51.1645 / 51°9'52"N

Longitude: -1.441 / 1°26'27"W

OS Eastings: 439180

OS Northings: 140736

OS Grid: SU391407

Mapcode National: GBR 736.VY6

Mapcode Global: VHC2Z.ZZ1N

Entry Name: The Priory

Listing Date: 7 January 1952

Grade: II*

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1301832

English Heritage Legacy ID: 139761

Location: Wherwell, Test Valley, Hampshire, SP11

County: Hampshire

District: Test Valley

Civil Parish: Wherwell

Built-Up Area: Wherwell

Traditional County: Hampshire

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Hampshire

Church of England Parish: Wherwell St Peter and Holy Cross

Church of England Diocese: Winchester

Find accommodation in
Andover

Listing Text

In the entry for:

3940 WHERWELL The Priory
9/35 II*
7.1.52

GV

The entry shall be amended to read;

3940 WHERWELL The Priory
9/35 II*
7.1.52
GV

A country mansion of the early C18 with additions of mid C18; altered C19 and C20.
Main fronts of stucco; slate roof with some leaded flats. The north and east elevations
are classical facades, the east elevation altered mid C20 when the double-height
dining room was created. East and west elevations acquireicanted bays at their northern
ends in mid C18. Symmetrical east elevation of 2 storeys and attic, 1.3.1 windows,
with a tall room behind the centrepiece, with half-octagonal projections at each
end. Parapet with stone coping and wood modillion cornice (carried round the ends
with modillions), quoins, architraves, 1st floor band, plinth, 3 panels with swags
above the taller openings of the centrepiece: the ends are simpler with keys to the
plain openings. Sashes; sashes to the dormers, which have leaded flat roofs. The
roof is hipped and behind it is a cupola on a square clock tower, with cornice on
brackets. The north elevation (incorporating the half-octagon at its east side)
is regular, of 2 storeys and attic, 3.4.2 windows, with a taller half-octagonal
projection at its west end. Parapet, coved cornice, plain architraves, 1st floor
band to the slightly-recessed centre, plinth. Sashes (some Victorian). Entrance
porch of a Doric Order with blocking course, entablature with modillions and 2 plain
columns forward of 2 pilasters; now filled in with glazing. The general style continues
along most of the south elevation, which has walls of mixed stone and flint, with
stone dressings: a south-projecting single-storeyed - service wing on the west
side abuts the stream, with a stone base wall, flint walls with red brick quoins
and band, a tile roof, and mullioned and transomed windows.

The INTERIORS are mostly of C18 and panelled. Hall is entirely bolection panelled
with Doric fluted pilasters. An arch, the reveal of which is more simply treated
suggesting C19 or C20 alteration, provides a view of the stairs. These are themselves
in 2 flights with landings - in a narrow open well, with open string,
three barleysugar balusters per tread, and an elaborate tread end - treatment
with blocks and consoles. The newels are fluted Corinthian and the panelled dado
carries corresponding pilasters. The Library is fully ovolo panelled with an Ionic
cornice. The Drawing Room was probably formed in the 1920s or 1930s to take the
four large paintings around which its moulded decoration has been designed and which
are affixed by bolection surrounds. These paintings are capricci of excellent
Continental quality which came from Brook House, Park Lane, (demolished 1933), perhaps
at the death of Sir Ernest Cassel to whom the then owner Lady Brecknock was related.
High coved ceiling. Black marble fireplace of austere Greek Revival character.
Large sideboard with four lion masks and feet to legs. The Kitchen (in the rear
wing) is nearly intact as furnished in the mid C18 or earlier with wide-arched fireplace,
fitted dresser an curvaceous hanging shelves. The back stair is of 3 flights, dog-leg
and closed string, with bulbous column-on-vase balusters, halved on the square newels:
it is probably early C18. On the first floor, which was reduced in size when the
Dining Room was formed, there are several panelled rooms, with bolection panelling
where undisturbed, and contemporary chimneypieces.

The house is on the site of a Benedictine Nunnery (founded c986). The canalised
stream from the River Test, turning at right-angles and passing under the house,
follows the line created for the drainage of the monastic buildings, and the re-use
of stone, as well as some very thick interior walls, are traces of the medieval building.

------------------------------------

3940 WHERWELL The Priory

9/35 II*

7.1.52

GV

The entry shall be amended to read:

3940 WHERWELL The Priory

9/35 II*

7.1.52

GV

A country mansion of the early C18 with additions of mid C18; altered C19 and C20.
Main fronts of stucco; slate roof with some leaded flats. The north and east elevations
are classical facades, the east elevation altered mid C20 when the double-height
dining room was created. East and west elevations acquired canted bays at their
northern ends in mid C18. Symmetrical east elevation of 2 storeys and attic,
1.3.1. windows, with a tall room behind the centrepiece, with half-octagonal
projections at each end. Parapet with stone coping and wood modillion cornice
(carried round the ends with modillions), quoins, architraves, It floor band,
plinth, 3 panels with swags above the taller openings of the centrepiece: the
ends are simpler with keys to the plain openings. Sashes; sashes to the dormers,
which have leaded flat roofs. The roof is hipped and behind it is a cupola on
a square clock tower, with cornice on brackets. The north elevation (incorporating -
the half-octagon at its east side) is regular, of 2 storeys and attic, 3.4.2
windows, with a taller half-octagonal projection at its west end. Parapet, coved
cornice, plain architraves 1st floor band to the slightly-recessed centre, plinth.
Sashes (some Victorian). Entrance porch of a Doric Order with blocking course,
entablature'with modillions and 2 plain columns forward of 2 pilasters; now filled
in with glazing. The general style continues along most of the south elevation,
which has walls of mixed stone and flint, with stone dressings: a south-projecting
single-storeyed service wing on the west side abuts the stream, with a stone base
wall, flint walls with red brick quoins and band, a tile roof, and mullioned
and transomed windows.

The interiors are mostly of C18 and panelled. Hall is entirely bolection panelled
with Doric fluted pilasters. An arch, the reveal of which is more simple treated
suggesting C19 or C20 alteration, provides a view of the stairs. These are themselves
in 2 flights with landings ina narrow open well, with open string, three barleysugar
balusters per tread, and an elaborate tread end treatment with blocks and consoles.
The newels are fluted Corinthian and the panelled dado carries corresponding
pilasters. The Library is fully ovolo panelled with an Ionic cornice. The Dining
Room was probably formed in the 1920s or 1930s. High coved ceiling. Black marble
fireplace of austere Greek Revival character. The Kitchen (in the rear wing)
is nearly intact as furnished in the mid C18 or earlier with wide-arched fireplace,
fitted dresser and curvaceous hanging'shelves. The back stair is of 3 flights,
dog-leg and closed string, with bulbous column-on-vase balusters, halved on the
square newels: it is probably early C18. On the first floor, which was reduced
in size when the Dining Room was formed, there are several panelled rooms, with
bolection panelling where undisturbed, and contemporary chimneypieces.

The house is on the site of a Benedictine Nunnery (founded c986). The canalised
stream from the River Test, turning at right-angles and passing under the house,
follows the line created for the drainage of the monastic buildings, and the
re-use of stone, as well as some very think interior walls, are traces of the
medieval building.

------------------------------------


3940 WHERWELL
7-1-52
9/35 The Priory

II*

A country mansion of the C18, on the site of a Benedictine Nunnery (founded
about 986), with alterations of the early C19 period. The canalised
stream from the River Test, turning at right-angles and passing under the
house, follows the line created for the drainage of the monastic buildings, and
the re-use of stone, as well as some very thick interior walls, are traces
of the mediaeval building. The north and east elevations are classical facades,
recast in the early C19. Slate roof, some leaded flats, the main fronts being
of stucco. Symmetrical east elevation of 2 storeys and attic, 1.3.1 windows,
with a tall room behind the centrepiece, with ½-octagonal projections at each
end. Parapet with stone coping and wood modillion cornice (carried round the
ends without medillions), quoins, architraves, 1st floor band, plinth, 3 Panels
with swags above the taller openings of the centrepiece: the ends are simpler
with keys to the plain openings. Sashes: sashes to the dormers, which have
leaded flat roofs. The roof is hipped and behind it is a cupola on a square
clock tower, with cornice on brackets. The north elevation (incorporating the
½-octagon at its east side) is regular, of 2 storeys and attic, 3.4.2 windows,
with a taller ½-octagonal projection at its west end. Parapet, coved cornice,
plain architraves, 1st floor band to the slightly-recessed centre, plinth.
Sashes (some Victorian). Entrance porch of a Doric Order with blocking course,
entablature with modillions and 2 plain columns forward of 2 pilasters; now
filled in with glazing. The general style continues along most of the south
elevation, which has walls of mixed stone and flint, with stone dressings:
a south-projecting single-storeyed service wing on the west side abuts the
stream, with a stone base wall, flint walls with red brick quoins and band, a tile
roof, and mullioned and transomed windows. Inside, there is a panelled hall,
a C18 staircase, and a coved ceiling to the 2-storeyed central room on the
east side; some of the panelling surrounds walls of unusual thickness (of possible
medieval origin).


Listing NGR: SU3913140918

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

Other nearby listed buildings

BritishListedBuildings.co.uk is an independent online resource and is not associated with any government department. All government data published here is used under licence. Please do not contact BritishListedBuildings.co.uk for any queries related to any individual listed building, planning permission related to listed buildings or the listing process itself.

British Listed Buildings is a Good Stuff website.