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Guest House of Coggeshall Abbey

A Grade I Listed Building in Coggeshall, Essex

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Coordinates

Latitude: 51.8676 / 51°52'3"N

Longitude: 0.6934 / 0°41'36"E

OS Eastings: 585535

OS Northings: 222207

OS Grid: TL855222

Mapcode National: GBR QKF.VJ0

Mapcode Global: VHJJL.YBY4

Entry Name: Guest House of Coggeshall Abbey

Listing Date: 2 May 1953

Last Amended: 6 September 1988

Grade: I

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1307071

English Heritage Legacy ID: 116044

Location: Coggeshall, Braintree, Essex, CO6

County: Essex

District: Braintree

Civil Parish: Coggeshall

Traditional County: Essex

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Essex

Church of England Parish: Coggeshall with Markshall

Church of England Diocese: Chelmsford

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Listing Text

TL 8422-8522 COGGESHALL ABBEY LANE
(south side)

9/13 Guest-house of
2.5.53 Coggeshall Abbey
(formerly listed as
the Chapel of St.
Catherine, Coggeshall
Abbey)

GV I

Guest-house of Cistercian abbey, now boiler-house. Circa 1190, altered in late
C16. Walls of flint rubble containing brick, with dressings of brick, raised
with re-used original brick and tile; gables timber framed and weatherboarded;
roofed with handmade red plain tiles. Rectangular plan aligned NNE-SSW
(described here by the cardinal points) with axial stack, 1984. S wall
demolished for post-Dissolution use as a barn. The W and E walls have each 4
lancet windows recessed in 2 plain orders; all are partly repaired, and 3 on the
E are partly blocked. The N wall has at the W end a doorway with round arch and
rear-arch, with rounded external arrises formed of moulded bricks, rebated
internally for a door. The quoins are mainly of brick 0.33 x 0.15 x 0.045
metre, and are all partly repaired. Internally there are 5 recesses for seats
in each of the W and E walls, and 2 in the N wall, all with round arches and
similar rounded arrises; 2 on the W are partly filled with later masonry, but
otherwise unaltered; 2 on th E are partly filled, and one is repaired; one on
the N has lost its brick arch; the other has an internal pier of later
brickwork, and is obstructed by a boiler flue of 1984. The N wall is reduced in
thickness in 2 stages, with flat ledges; there is no evidence of beam-sockets
for a floor. The walls have been raised approximately 0.50 metre in the late
C16. The late C16 roof is in 2 bays, of clasped purlin construction with arched
wind-braces, rafters of horizontal section, with bird-mouthed collars at the
half-bay positions, complete. The amendment notice of 30 December 1958
identified this building as the Chapel of St Catherine; J.S. Gardner cites
documentary evidence of 1464 that the Chapel was N of the (demolished) Nave
(Coggeshall Abbey and its early brickwork, Journal of the British Archaeological
Association, third series 18, 1955, 19-32 and plates 5-14). Gardner states from
excavated evidence that the S wall originally had a doorway in line with that in
the N wall, with a porch. Between them a floor of tiles on edge has been
exposed, approximately 0.80 metre below present ground level. RCHM (Little
Coggeshall) 2. A.M.


Listing NGR: TL8553522207

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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