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Yorkshire Bank

A Grade II Listed Building in City, Bradford

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Coordinates

Latitude: 53.7976 / 53°47'51"N

Longitude: -1.7566 / 1°45'23"W

OS Eastings: 416128

OS Northings: 433504

OS Grid: SE161335

Mapcode National: GBR JJJ.B7

Mapcode Global: WHC98.ZTP1

Entry Name: Yorkshire Bank

Listing Date: 9 August 1983

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1314499

English Heritage Legacy ID: 336945

Location: Bradford, BD1

County: Bradford

Electoral Ward/Division: City

Built-Up Area: Bradford

Traditional County: Yorkshire

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): West Yorkshire

Church of England Parish: Cathedral Church of St Peter Bradford

Church of England Diocese: Leeds

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Listing Text

1.
5111 NORTH PARADE BD1

No 40
SE 1633 35/905 (Yorkshire Bank)
SE 1633 ST 36/905

II GV


2.
Includes No 41 Manor Row. Prominent and acute corner site at apex of Manor Row
and North Parade. Built as the Yorkshire Penny Bank 1895, L Ledingham architect.
Sandstone ashlar, profusely decorated and richly modelled facades, an admixture
of Franco-Flemish and Italian Renaissance details; notable quality of carving and
stone masonry. Three storeys and attic, bowed corner of 3 bays and 4 bay side
elevations. Deep stepped and moulded plinth, entablatures to each floor; very ornate
frieze to main bracket cornice, with strapwork and festoon decoration. The tripartite
corner composition has an open arcade with oval vestibule behind. The piers are
oval in section with foliate caps and twisted fluting to necks. Colonettes applied
to front of each pier and continued as pilasters dividing the profusely carved
strapwork and rinceaux spandrels. Deeply moulded arches with spaced voussoirs and
console keystones. First floor articulated by pilaster stops, the windows of 2 lights
with corkscrew fluted shaft colonettes as mullions. The second floor is treated as
open arcade similar to ground floor and providing a balcony. Above the balustraded
parapet is an aediculed dormer with shell carving to tympanum, stepped broken
pediment. Small flanking archways with elaborate scrolled crestings and supports.
Behind the dormer rises a truncated octagonal slate spire supporting the clock
turret which is also octagonal and battered, the faces articulated by projecting
columns, festooned frieze and concave swept cornice, surmounted by shallow ogee
lead dome. Short staff wing from finial to support weathervane. Flanking the
corner and terminating the side elevations are canted bartizan turrets, corbelled
out from ground floor entablature on oriel bases. Narrow pedimented windows
on their first floor flanked by arches and on the top stage blind arcading; the
turrets are crowned by low stone domes with ball finials. Four bay side elevations
have 2 light windows, identical to those on first floor of corner but with plain
mullions to second floor. Arcaded ground floor windows for banking hall, similar
to porch in detail. Broken segmental pedimented dormers with flanking columns. The
banking hall has a richly decorated plaster ceiling with rinceaux and strapwork.
Marble faced dado and mahogany furnishings.


Listing NGR: SE1612833504

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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