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Trafalgar Dry Dock

A Grade II Listed Building in Bargate, City of Southampton

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Coordinates

Latitude: 50.8939 / 50°53'37"N

Longitude: -1.401 / 1°24'3"W

OS Eastings: 442226

OS Northings: 110659

OS Grid: SU422106

Mapcode National: GBR 87W.SQJ

Mapcode Global: FRA 76YR.406

Entry Name: Trafalgar Dry Dock

Listing Date: 14 June 1988

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1340039

English Heritage Legacy ID: 135994

Location: Southampton, SO14

County: City of Southampton

Electoral Ward/Division: Bargate

Built-Up Area: Southampton

Traditional County: Hampshire

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Hampshire

Church of England Parish: Southampton City Centre St Mary

Church of England Diocese: Winchester

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Listing Text

The following building shall be added to the list

SU 4210 SOUTHAMPTON DOCKS

5/292 Trafalgar Dry Dock


Dry Dock constructed in 1905 and enlarged in 1913 and 1922. Built of concrete, the
original construction requiring 130,000 cubic yards of concrete. It had steel entrance
gates operated by direct acting vertical engines. Stepped sides with series of
concrete linking stairways. By 1913 although it was the largest drydock in the world
it was not large enough to receive the newly built SS Olympic so it was enlarged. At
the same time the steel gates were removed and replaced by a sliding steel caisson which
allowed the level of water inside the dock to be maintained against a falling tide. In
1922 the dock was enlarged again to accommodate the SS Berengaria. This was done by
cutting a V-shaped section into the head of the dock into which the liner's bow fitted,
leaving only 10 inches between the side of the ship and the dock wall. From 1924
onwards the larger Cunard liners began to be serviced by a large floating dock and after
1933 by the King George V Graving Dock. Included for historical interest for its
connection with the earlier ocean going liners.


Listing NGR: SU4255313582

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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