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Church of St Lawrence

A Grade I Listed Building in Great Waldingfield, Suffolk

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Coordinates

Latitude: 52.0606 / 52°3'38"N

Longitude: 0.7877 / 0°47'15"E

OS Eastings: 591203

OS Northings: 243914

OS Grid: TL912439

Mapcode National: GBR RJK.V91

Mapcode Global: VHKF4.LGSP

Entry Name: Church of St Lawrence

Listing Date: 9 February 1978

Grade: I

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1351751

English Heritage Legacy ID: 278020

Location: Great Waldingfield, Babergh, Suffolk, CO10

County: Suffolk

District: Babergh

Civil Parish: Great Waldingfield

Traditional County: Suffolk

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Suffolk

Church of England Parish: Great Waldingfield

Church of England Diocese: St.Edmundsbury and Ipswich

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Great Waldingfield

Listing Text

THE STREET
1.
5377 (North Side)
Great Waldingfield
Church of St Lawrence
TL 9143 23/225 23.3.61.
I GV

2.
A flint and stone church built at the end of the C14 by John Appleton.
There is a fine west tower of 3 stages with castellated parapet and diagonal
buttresses. A half octagonal staircase turret rises on the south-east
corner. The nave and aisles have battlemented parapets and on the south
side there is an inscription along the parapet seeking prayer, probably
for the soul of John Appleton. There is some flush work and chequerboard
pattern. The south porch has a castellated parapet and some flushwork
ornamentation. The north porch was restored 1827-29 and the chancel was
rebuilt between 1866-69 by William Butterfield. The nave roof has good
moulded and carved beams and the aisles have moulded beams And joists.
The communion rail was taken from the Church of St Michael, Cornhill in
the City of London and is probably the work of Richard Cleere Circa 1670-75.
Graded for its architectural, historical and topographical value.


Listing NGR: TL9120343914

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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