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The Swan (Including Attached Outbuildings)

A Grade II* Listed Building in Hoxne, Suffolk

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Coordinates

Latitude: 52.3494 / 52°20'57"N

Longitude: 1.1994 / 1°11'57"E

OS Eastings: 618003

OS Northings: 277187

OS Grid: TM180771

Mapcode National: GBR VKL.Q1N

Mapcode Global: VHL9G.Q6YS

Entry Name: The Swan (Including Attached Outbuildings)

Listing Date: 29 July 1955

Last Amended: 14 April 1988

Grade: II*

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1352375

English Heritage Legacy ID: 281047

Location: Hoxne, Mid Suffolk, Suffolk, IP21

County: Suffolk

District: Mid Suffolk

Civil Parish: Hoxne

Traditional County: Suffolk

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Suffolk

Church of England Parish: Hoxne St Peter and St Paul

Church of England Diocese: St.Edmundsbury and Ipswich

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Listing Text

HOXNE LOW STREET (west side)
TM 17 NE
The Swan (including
7/106
attached outbuildings)
(formerly listed as
29.7.55 Swan Inn)
II*
GV
Public house. Early C16 2-cell end-chimney hall range; mid C16 parlour
addition to south, with higher roof ridge. Early C18 alterations. Timber
framed. The facade is cased in early C18 colourwashed brick with a coved
eaves cornice; the south gable end is similar, with tumbling and a crowstepped
gable. To the rear there is good exposed studding with original herringbone
brick nogging, now colourwashed. Plaintiled roof. 2 storeys. 7-bay facade,
with bays 1 and 3 blind: late C19 cross windows with red brick segmental
arches. Doorway in cross-entry position, with C19 4-panel door. Above the
doorway a further blind panel. Heavy square stack at junction of hall and
parlour, the upper portion rebuilt. Small gable stack to north. To the rear
much C16 work is still visible. Behind the stack is a small gabled wing,
probably for the original stair, with exposed studs and brick nogging; the
gable end had a jettied upper floor. Against the lower end of the hall is a
fine gabled porch, added at a slightly later date, also with good studding and
brick nogging. The ground floor was open on 3 sides, each side with long
braces meeting at the centre; at the gable end the upper floor was jettied,
with further overhangs at tie beam and collar level. The porch has many
moulded components and evidence for a projecting first floor window. Between
the stair wing and porch is an early C18 colourwashed brick gabled addition
with an original sash window. The lower parts of all 3 are obscured by C19
and C20 work. A further rear gabled addition, perhaps C17, against the
parlour. Attached to this are 3 probably C18 outbuildings at right angles to
each other, with crowstepping to the road front. All are of colourwashed
brick with pantiled roofs. Interior. Hall has a fine ceiling with fully-
moulded cross-beams and closely-spaced moulded joists. Hall chamber open
truss has long shallow tie beam braces with a simple cavetto mould. The porch
attached to this section has double ogee moulded joists to the ground floor
ceiling; the steeply-cambered first floor ceiling was also fully moulded, with
a ridge piece, but most is concealed and the joists are lost. The parlour
addition is wider than the hall range, the extra width forming a rear side
passage. The existence of a C16 side passage suggests that the building was
already an inn. The parlour has moulded cross-beams and a dragon beam,
evidence that the front and gable end of this section were once jettied.
Ceiling of parlour chamber has 2 chamfered bridging beams intersecting with
moulded axial beams; moulded joists, possibly re-used. First floor room in
former stair wing has a stuccoed fireplace over which is an early C18 plaster
cartouche: the central oval tablet shows a Resurrection scene and above is a
coat of arms which contained the sacred monogram IHS. This room is likely to
have been a private chapel for a Roman Catholic family. 4-centre arched
doorways and original moulded doors. 2 doorways into bedrooms over the hall
have C17 fretted overlights. Fine queen-post roofs over both phases, the
later end lacking collar braces.


Listing NGR: TM1800377187

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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