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Lassiters Cottage

A Grade II Listed Building in Midhurst, West Sussex

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Coordinates

Latitude: 50.9887 / 50°59'19"N

Longitude: -0.7395 / 0°44'22"W

OS Eastings: 488567

OS Northings: 121794

OS Grid: SU885217

Mapcode National: GBR DDW.ZTF

Mapcode Global: FRA 96BH.PPZ

Entry Name: Lassiters Cottage

Listing Date: 18 October 2011

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1403819

Location: Midhurst, Chichester, West Sussex, GU29

County: West Sussex

District: Chichester

Civil Parish: Midhurst

Built-Up Area: Midhurst

Traditional County: Sussex

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): West Sussex

Church of England Parish: Midhurst St Mary Magdalene and St Denis

Church of England Diocese: Chichester

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Summary

Lassiters Cottage is an ironstone cottage probably constructed in 1838.

Description

Lassiters Cottage is an early C19 two bay end chimneystack cottage with an integral rear outshot. It is built of the locally relatively rare building material ironstone in small courses, with red and grey brick end quoins. The slate roof, probably replacing a tiled roof dated 1838, is hipped to the north and gabled to the south, where there is an end brick chimneystack, not projecting. The front or west elevation is of two storeys with cambered headed openings to the first-floor windows, which are C20 wooden casements with glazing bars. The two ground-floor windows are similar and in the centre is a half-glazed C20 wooden door. The south side has one casement window and a cambered headed doorcase in the outshot. A single-storey brick and rendered extension with slate roof and wooden casement windows has been added on to this side but is shown on the First Edition Ordnance Survey map. The east or rear elevation slopes to ground-floor level. There are attached boundary walls of stone rubble with brick coping.

The ground-floor front room has a large cambered opening to the fireplace, adjoining to the east a round-headed recess with thin wooden shelves for displaying china and to the west a plank door leading into the extension. A ledged and plank door leads into the outshot which houses the staircase, of half-winder type with moulded wooden balustrade, square posts and plank balustrading. Underneath is a plank cupboard door. The first floor has two bedrooms with plank doors. One bedroom is reported to retain a fireplace which has been covered over.

History

Lassiters Cottage formerly belonged to the Cowdray estate and is reported to have been named after the chauffeur of a deceased Lord Cowdray. The first Viscount Cowdray, given the title in 1917, died in 1927; the second in 1933, and the third in 1995. A roof tile dated 1838 with the name William Pickell (or Pickett) appears to date the building accurately, and it is shown on the tithe map of 1847. The south single storey extension is a later addition but is shown on the first edition Ordnance Survey map of 1875.

Reasons for Listing


* Plan form: a late example of a two bay end chimneystack house with an integral rear outshot.
* Material: the use of such small ironstone blocks is very rare and the material is unusual in Midhurst.
* Interiors: a very complete cottage interior.
* Degree of survival: survives substantially intact.

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