History in Structure

This site is entirely user-supported. See how you can help.

8-9

A Grade II Listed Building in Carmarthen, Carmarthenshire

Approximate Location Map
Large Map »
Street View
Contributor Photos »

Street View is the best available vantage point looking, if possible, towards the location of the building. In some locations, Street View may not give a view of the actual building, or may not be available at all. Where it is not available, the satellite view is shown instead.

Coordinates

Latitude: 51.8564 / 51°51'22"N

Longitude: -4.3084 / 4°18'30"W

OS Eastings: 241123

OS Northings: 220049

OS Grid: SN411200

Mapcode National: GBR DG.T7YT

Mapcode Global: VH3LH.8LPS

Entry Name: 8-9

Listing Date: 19 May 1981

Last Amended: 28 November 2003

Grade: II

Source: Cadw

Source ID: 9423

Building Class: Commercial

Location: Situated on corner of Dark Gate.

County: Carmarthenshire

Community: Carmarthen

Locality: Dark Gate

Traditional County: Carmarthenshire

Find accommodation in
Carmarthen

History

Mid C19 corner building, on site of causeway across mill dam, which was modified when Blue Street was built c 1805. The former Nag's Head inn, marked on 1834 map, later which was part of the Half Moon Hotel at No 1 Blue Street adjoining (q.v.), housing the bar and spirit stores. The Half Moon was run by William Bright and his widow to 1884, then by Henry Cadle, whose name is shown on the Blue Street side wall of these premises in a late C19 engraving. The engraving shows no windows on the right of the Blue Street facade, but windows in the chamfered corner, and a shop-front with corner entry. The lower range to Dark Gate had different fenestration. Facade detail probably c1900. In 1914 run by Mrs. Margaret Ann Askin. In 1926 Nos 8-9 occupied by Evan Morris & Son, outfitters, for whom J.H.Morgan designed a shopfront in 1919. Shown in earlier C20 photograph with shopfront (now gone) marked Hosier Stores. In 2001 mostly owned by Cheltenham & Gloucester Building Society and called Cheltenham House, the upper floors leased and entered from a door in the lower range. No 8 - now a shop - occupies part of the lower range.
Formerly listed with No 1A Blue Street, but this number no longer is used.

Exterior

Three-storey corner building with chamfered corner and close-eaved slate hipped roof, also chamfered at corner, and 2-storey wing to Dark Gate. Painted stucco, channelled on ground floor with moulded cornice, the ground floor remodelled in C20. Two-bay similar elevations to both Blue Street and Dark Gate with 12-pane horned sash windows in stuccoed surrounds on upper floors and no windows in chamfered angle. On ground floor to Blue Street, former house door to left, changed to window since 1981, wide plate glass window in centre and plate glass fixed doors to right, all late C20. Narrow plate-glass window on ground floor corner. To Dark Gate, ground floor has three openings, 2 with plate glass windows, the second with double doors, all late C20.
Low 2-storey range to left, partly No 9, partly No 8, has slate eaves roof and 4 upper 12-pane sashes in moulded surrounds. Ground floor has similar C20 detail to elsewhere, channelled stucco with cornice. Broad C20 shop window and similar sized double C20 doors, into No 9A and broader and taller C20 plate glass shopfront to No 8 to right, with stucco voussoirs above.

Interior

Staircase in No 1A Blue Street (left side of Blue Street elevation) with straight balusters and heavy turned newel, noted in 1981 has been removed and interiors of No 9 all remodelled since 1981.

Reasons for Listing

Included as late Georgian style corner building on a principal crossroads, retaining original form externally.

Other nearby listed buildings

BritishListedBuildings.co.uk is an independent online resource and is not associated with any government department. All government data published here is used under licence. Please do not contact BritishListedBuildings.co.uk for any queries related to any individual listed building, planning permission related to listed buildings or the listing process itself.

British Listed Buildings is a Good Stuff website.