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Llifior Mill

A Grade II Listed Building in Berriew, Powys

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Coordinates

Latitude: 52.5801 / 52°34'48"N

Longitude: -3.2069 / 3°12'24"W

OS Eastings: 318315

OS Northings: 298713

OS Grid: SO183987

Mapcode National: GBR 9X.BK45

Mapcode Global: WH7B1.QD3W

Entry Name: Llifior Mill

Listing Date: 21 August 1995

Last Amended: 21 August 1995

Grade: II

Source: Cadw

Source ID: 16381

Building Class: Industrial

Location: On the Llifior Brook, approx 1km S of Garthmyl.

County: Powys

Community: Berriew (Aberriw)

Community: Berriew

Locality: Garthmyl

Traditional County: Montgomeryshire

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Berriew

History

The mill house is C17 in origin, and it seems likely that the origins of the mill itself can be traced back at least this far, although the present mill building was rebuilt c1860 following a fire. The drying kiln incorporated into the wing of the house is probably C18; some alterations were made in the mid C19 by the Vaynor Estate. In the early C19, the miller was Thomas Jones, who later (in 1841) became the first missionary to the Khasai region of NE Bengal.

Exterior

Original house is at the centre of the range, flanked by its later cross-wing (incorporating grain-drying kiln to the rear) on the right, and the mill building to the left. Timber framed with painted brick nogging and plinth: square panels, divided structurally into 3 bays by continuous vertical posts. Slate roof. Baffle entry against gable end stack to the right. Casement windows of 2 and 3-lights, and similar windows in gabled framed dormers within the roof. Brick stack with plain coupled shafts. Advanced wing to left is rubble stone in its return wall, but faced in brick with paired casement windows in chamfered architraves (characteristic of the Vaynor Estate). Axial stack in wing of same design as main range. Mill to the left is brick with slate roof. 2 storeys with attic: central doorway with similar loading door above, flanked by fixed light windows on each floor; all openings have cambered brick heads. Overshot wheel against left hand gable: iron wheel and box trough supplying water from a leat.

Interior

Mill retains most of its machinery, including 3 sets of spur wheels on a horizontal shaft to ground floor: 2 pairs of stones (one with lifting crane) on upper stone floor, together with a wire machine. Flour and grain bins suspended below second floor. Drying kiln forms part of the cross-wing of the house: small oven against rear wall, and brick arched vaulted ceiling: drying floor had perforated tiles carried on an iron framework: the tiles are no longer in situ.

Reasons for Listing

An exceptionally well-preserved and complete example of a small rural water corn mill which is of considerable historical interest.

Other nearby listed buildings

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