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Waundwrgi farmhouse

A Grade II Listed Building in Llanddewi Velfrey, Pembrokeshire

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Coordinates

Latitude: 51.8164 / 51°48'58"N

Longitude: -4.6561 / 4°39'21"W

OS Eastings: 217018

OS Northings: 216417

OS Grid: SN170164

Mapcode National: GBR CZ.WRQY

Mapcode Global: VH2P1.7LVY

Entry Name: Waundwrgi farmhouse

Listing Date: 15 October 1997

Last Amended: 15 October 1997

Grade: II

Source: Cadw

Source ID: 18985

Building Class: Domestic

Location: 2 km E of the village of Llanddewi Velfrey, reached by a lane branching to the S of the A40(T) opposite to Gwindy.

County: Pembrokeshire

Community: Llanddewi Velfrey (Llanddewi Efelffre)

Community: Llanddewi Velfrey

Locality: Waundwrgi

Traditional County: Pembrokeshire

Find accommodation in
Lampeter-Velfrey

History

Probably an early C18 house with an enlargement, doubling its size, dated on its roof carpentry 1776; this was perhaps in the time of owners named Bowen. The large adjacent stable has carpentry dated 1789. The farm is said to have played an important part in the local trade in horses: the field immediately to its SE is named Horse Park in 1840, at which date the farm was owned by Elizabeth Davies and occupied by David Davies.

Exterior

The older block is a two-storey, two-unit house with two windows to the front (facing SW) and door position offset right of centre. Large chimney at left, concealed within a large later block in tandem. Two-storey rear wing at right angles to this older part. The later block at left (1776) is of two storeys and attic, and has a larger chimney at its left gable. Rear part of the later block is under a catslide roof. Later single-storey gabled porch at front where the two blocks adjoin. Rubble masonry in the front of the older part and generally at the rear; larger stones better brought to courses in the front of the later part. Slate roofs with tile ridges. End chimneys of similar stone with several top courses replaced in brickwork. Twelve-pane sash windows in exposed frames at front in both parts, mostly restored. One window converted to double doors with a slated canopy. In the original house the windows have stone lintels, in the later block slightly cambered flat stone or brick arches.

Interior

Small entrance hallway with dogleg stairs at rear; four- or six-panel doors to rooms each side. Early plastered partitions said to be stiffened with brambles. Big chimney at left of original house, with original doorway into the later block at its rear. The oven has a salt shelf at the right. The large chimney in the gable end of the later block is intact, still open to the sky; blocked by a wall at front, but there is access through a side door, where there was probably originally a large bread oven.

In the attic of the later block there are trusses with cambered high collars. On the W side of one is carved 'EH x E x G x 1776' and on the E side of the same truss 'x DB x EB x'. The latter inscription is thought to refer to sisters named Bowen. The principals in the lean-to catslide at rear of the later block have curved feet, in the manner of local pseudo-crucks.

Reasons for Listing

Listed as a vernacular farmhouse much enlarged in the late C18 to form a large farmhouse of considerable character, with interesting carpentry.

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