History in Structure

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Ty Iocws, also known as Yoke House, and attached dwelling

A Grade II Listed Building in Llannor, Gwynedd

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Coordinates

Latitude: 52.9034 / 52°54'12"N

Longitude: -4.4112 / 4°24'40"W

OS Eastings: 237926

OS Northings: 336716

OS Grid: SH379367

Mapcode National: GBR 5B.P2X5

Mapcode Global: WH44J.69P1

Entry Name: Ty Iocws, also known as Yoke House, and attached dwelling

Listing Date: 8 February 1999

Last Amended: 8 February 1999

Grade: II

Source: Cadw

Source ID: 21336

Building Class: Domestic

Location: The house stands at the end of a long driveway leading off the main road approximately 1km N of Pwllheli.

County: Gwynedd

Town: Pwllheli

Community: Llannor

Community: Llannor

Locality: Abererch

Traditional County: Caernarfonshire

Find accommodation in
Abererch

History

The house was built for Griffith Jones, solicitor of Pwllheli and an agent of the Glynllifon Estate during the period 1840-1860, with the main front cross wing at the SE end probably added or remodelled shortly after.

Exterior

The building is built of local stone, rendered and lined, with raised rendered quoins to the front, unrendered rear wing, and with a slate roof. Two storeys and attics, three-bay front with a lean-to verandah, also slated, extending one bay beyond the gables at each end. Lean-to at the NW gable end. The verandah is supported on wooden columns, and has a slate floor. Within, three French-type windows, the centre forming the garden entrance, and 16-pane sash windows to the first floor, all openings having bold label hood mouldings with end drops and stiff-leaf terminals. Triple-flued stacks, linked at their outsetting heads. The long rear wing is of two parts, that nearest the house of 3 bays with a part-glazed door within a small late C19 porch, and tall 12-pane sashes to the first floor. The garden front has a canted bay window at the first bay adjoining the slate-hung gable of the main block, and modern uPVC windows. The second part, now a separate dwelling, is similar, has a large front porch, and considerably altered at the rear.

Reasons for Listing

Included as a substantial house of the area of the early and mid C19, built still within the Georgian tradition, employing a plan form and architectural detail favoured in high status houses of the region from the later C18.

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