History in Structure

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Former Miller's House at Melin Meiarth

A Grade II Listed Building in Gwyddelwern, Denbighshire

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Coordinates

Latitude: 53.0396 / 53°2'22"N

Longitude: -3.387 / 3°23'13"W

OS Eastings: 307101

OS Northings: 350042

OS Grid: SJ071500

Mapcode National: GBR 6N.DKRW

Mapcode Global: WH77M.YVBP

Entry Name: Former Miller's House at Melin Meiarth

Listing Date: 19 September 2000

Last Amended: 14 February 2001

Grade: II

Source: Cadw

Source ID: 23997

Building Class: Domestic

Location: Near remains of Meiarth Mill, beside the River Clwyd to the west of Bryn Saith Marchog.

County: Denbighshire

Town: Corwen

Community: Gwyddelwern

Community: Gwyddelwern

Locality: Bryn Saith Marchog

Traditional County: Merionethshire

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Derwen

History

A miller's house probably of the late C18/early C19. In 1840 the property was described as 'mill and yard' and recorded as part of Meiarth farm, owned and occupied by Robert Wynn esq. with no tenant named; the map appears to show the present house. A single storey range at its lower end was formerly the shippon, but is now part of the house.

The mill survives nearby as a roofless ruin with remains of an adjacent corn dryer.

Exterior

Two-storey miller's house built in local axe-dressed gritstone with larger stones at quoins. Roof of small slates with moderate eaves and verge overhangs; tile ridge; late-C19 end chimney stacks of yellow brick built on the bases of earlier red-brick stacks. Symmetrical three window front elevation with central vertically boarded door and overlight. The windows above and below are probably restored, of sash type, with horns, each of 16 panes, in exposed frames. The central window (above the door) is slightly smaller than the others. At rear (partly concealed by creeper) the fenestration is irregular: one similar sash window above, one below, and one two-light casement window. The lower windows have segmental brick head arches.

The former shippon to the right is in similar materials, with a rear chimney stack; three modern windows to front in earlier doorways with brick arched heads; enlarged rear doorway and windows.

Interior

Interior not seen; said to retain its slate floors.

Reasons for Listing

A fine late-vernacular small house which has fully retained its character.

Other nearby listed buildings

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