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Church of St Sannan

A Grade II* Listed Building in Bargoed, Caerphilly

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Coordinates

Latitude: 51.6953 / 51°41'43"N

Longitude: -3.2072 / 3°12'25"W

OS Eastings: 316658

OS Northings: 200309

OS Grid: SO166003

Mapcode National: GBR HW.4KYP

Mapcode Global: VH6D7.CNB7

Entry Name: Church of St Sannan

Listing Date: 17 July 2001

Last Amended: 29 April 2002

Grade: II*

Source: Cadw

Source ID: 25522

Building Class: Religious, Ritual and Funerary

Location: In a large churchyard on the ridge of hill approximately 1.5km NE of Bargoed.

County: Caerphilly

Town: Bargoed

Community: Bargoed (Bargod)

Community: Bargoed

Locality: Bedwellty

Traditional County: Monmouthshire

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Mynyddislwyn

History

The church is dedicated to St Sannan, an Irish saint who died in the year 544. Medieval details in the present building date it from the C13 to C16, while the present tower is possibly C17. The church has 2 naves, of which the S is considerably older, while the N was called in Bradney's time 'capel newydd or the new chapel'. The naves were restored by W G & E Habershon in 1858-9, the chancel was rebuilt by G E Halliday in 1903-1905, and the N vestry is by E P Warren of 1909-1910.

Exterior

A church mainly in Tudor-Gothic style comprising 2 parallel naves, chancel continuous with and equal height to the N nave, W tower, S porch and NE vestry. Of rubble sandstone and stone-tile roof. The S nave has square-headed windows with 3 ogee-headed lights either side of the S porch, which has a moulded Tudor-arched surround and boarded doors. The chancel S wall has a pointed doorway to the L, a 3-light square-headed window to the R with hood mould, and a 5-light E window. The nave has two 3-light windows similar to the S side, and a 3-light W window with reticulated tracery and hood mould with head stops. The angle between N nave and tower is enclosed by C19 iron railings in simple Baroque style enclosing gravestones. The 2-stage embattled tower has a integral rectangular NE stair turret and pronounced larger quoins, The bell stage has 2-light square-headed windows with louvres. A string course is between the stages and the lower stage has a small S window. The W doorway has a broad chamfer and 4-centred head, and double boarded doors.

Interior

The N nave has a late medieval wagon roof. The naves are separated by an arcade with 4 stout circular piers, with sharply-pointed arches. The E arcade pier has 3 responds in trefoil plan. The tower arch has wave-moulded orders dying into the imposts. To its R is a Tudor doorway to the stair turret. The fittings are mainly of 1910, by Warren, commemorated in a plaque in the chancel. Many windows have late C19 or early C20 stained glass. The E window shows the Crucifixion and is attributed to Herbert W Bryans. The chancel S shows Dorcas, by A.J. Davies of c1925. In the N nave the NW windowdepicts SS Michael, David and Sannan by Kempe of 1896, and 2 windows, of 1917 and 1920, are by Wippell & Co.

Reasons for Listing

Listed at Grade II* as a well-preserved large though restored medieval church with an unusual plan, occupying a fine hill-top site.

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