History in Structure

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The Mount

A Grade II Listed Building in Llanfechain, Powys

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Coordinates

Latitude: 52.7729 / 52°46'22"N

Longitude: -3.2079 / 3°12'28"W

OS Eastings: 318608

OS Northings: 320158

OS Grid: SJ186201

Mapcode National: GBR 6X.Y78P

Mapcode Global: WH792.PKMM

Entry Name: The Mount

Listing Date: 28 January 2004

Last Amended: 28 January 2004

Grade: II

Source: Cadw

Source ID: 82436

Building Class: Domestic

Location: At north side of the B4393 to the east of Llanfechain village, at the foot of the Mount Motte and Bailey.

County: Powys

Community: Llanfechain

Community: Llanfechain

Locality: Llanfechain village

Traditional County: Montgomeryshire

Find accommodation in
Llanfyllin

History

A minor house of gentry status. Built in the late C18 or early C19 within the probable extent of the bailey of the mediaeval castle the motte of which remains a prominent feature to the rear of the site and gives it its name. Enlarged at rear in the early C20 and carefully restored.

The Mount was mentioned as 'Mount Cottage' in a deed of 57 Geo.III (1817) when purchased with several fields by Edward Evans. In 1839 it was noted as a cottage owned by John and Eleanor Evans and occupied by John Skelton. For much of the mid C19 it was a public house (T Lawrence, publican, recorded in 1841; D Watkin, publican, in 1851 and 1861). It ceased to be a public house in the late C19. In 1904 it was purchased by another Edward Evans, physician, who was probably the owner who enlarged the rear of the house and altered the front. The left room at front is believed to have been his surgery. Evans is thought to have been godfather to Major Bonnor Morris, and the house was Bonnor Morris property in the early C20. Now sold into separate ownership.

Exterior

The front range is of two storeys and three windows, facing south to the B4393. Local shaley stone informally coursed at front, uncoursed at sides. Slate roof of low pitch hipped at each end, with tiled ridge and hips. End chimneys in C19/20 red brick. The upper windows are of 16 panes, with restored horned sashes, slightly irregularly spaced. Large early C20 bays to the ground storey with canted sides and sash windows; single panes in the sashes but of ordinary quality glass. The bay windows stand on blue brick low walls. The bay windows are linked by a small verandah acting as an open fronted porch. A feature of the verandah is a large ornamental boldly curved timber frame. Semi-glazed main door with round-headed lights. The walling each side of the door is rendered.

Extending to rear are a gabled wing at the right, with lateral chimney, and an adjacent catslide extension at the left. The rear is in red brick with blue brick quoins. Inserted windows at the sides towards the rear also dressed in blue brick. On the west side the upper masonry of the rear extension is of different workmanship to the adjacent work and is probably part of the early C20 improvements. Small rooflight at rear.

Interior

Symmetrically planned with a narrow hallway from the front door, a wider space at rear with the stairs at one side rising rear towards the front (probably relocated).

Reasons for Listing

A fine minor Regency-style house sympathetically but innovatively altered in the early C20, which has retained its character.

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