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Church of St Thomas and St James

A Grade II Listed Building in Worsbrough, Barnsley

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Coordinates

Latitude: 53.5348 / 53°32'5"N

Longitude: -1.4619 / 1°27'42"W

OS Eastings: 435762

OS Northings: 404376

OS Grid: SE357043

Mapcode National: GBR LW7K.9L

Mapcode Global: WHDCX.JD2Z

Entry Name: Church of St Thomas and St James

Listing Date: 4 December 1986

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1192000

English Heritage Legacy ID: 333945

Location: Barnsley, S70

County: Barnsley

Electoral Ward/Division: Worsbrough

Built-Up Area: Worsbrough

Traditional County: Yorkshire

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): South Yorkshire

Church of England Parish: Worsbrough St Thomas and St James

Church of England Diocese: Sheffield

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Listing Text

WORSBROUGH BANK END ROAD
SE30SE (north side)

2/69 Church of St. Thomas
and St. James
GV II
Church. 1858, consecrated 1860. By Flockton and Sons for patron
F. W. T. Vernon-Wentworth; vestry added 1879. Coursed, dressed sandstone,
Welsh slate roof. 4-bay aisled nave with south porch, 2-bay chancel with north
and south vestries the latter rising as a 3-stage tower. Gothic Revival, in
Early English style. Nave: chamfered plinth, buttresses at west angle and between
bays 3 and 4. Porch to bay 2 with shafts in jambs of pointed arch, coped gable
with cross. Other bays have paired lancets with quoined reveals and hoodmoulds.
Clerestorey with small, cusped lancets in recessed panels beneath eaves corbel
table. West window of 3 lancets with separate hoods. Gable copings with crosses.
Tower: angle buttresses to lower stages flanking lancet windows, string courses
between stages. Paired belfry lancets, set in recessed panels beneath corbel
tables, have louvres and string course rising as hood. Octagonal, broach spire
with louvred 2-light lucarnes and weathervane. Chancel: lower; bay 2 beyond
tower has string course rising over lancet and continuing over east window of
5 lancets set in recessed ashlar panel; 2 lancets on right into vestry.

Interior: octagonal piers to double-chamfered aisle arcades, similar chancel arch
on responds. 2-bay arcade to north vestry and organ chamber has moulded arches,
eastern arch subdivided by central pier with blind quatrefoil in ashlar spandrel.
Encaustic-tiled sanctuary. Font: 1879, octagonal with wrought-iron cover; replaces
original font made of coal. Pulpit: octagonal set on marble shafts and with carved
panels in ogee-headed niches, eagle lecturn carved on cornice. Traceried dado
panelling; contemporary fittings include linenfold-panelled, part-glazed inner porch
doors beneath arch inscribed "Enter into His Gates with thanksgiving". Stained glass
east and west windows by Barnett and Co. Leith. Church originally dedicated to
St. Thomas prior to amalgamation with St. James' in 1955.

A. Wright, The First Hundred Years of St. Thomas' Worsbro' Dale church,
booklet, 1959.


Listing NGR: SE3576204376

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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